CPTnet

COLOMBIA: Public Declaration issued by CAHUCOPANA regarding the persecution of Carlos Usaga

CPTnet
March 21, 2016
COLOMBIA: Public Declaration issued by CAHUCOPANA regarding the persecution of Carlos Usaga 

 

The Corporation for Humanitarian Action, Cohabitation, and Peace in Northeast Antioquia – CAHUCOPANA – denounces the persecution and intimidation of Carlos Alfredo Palacios Usuga, member of the Board of Directors of CAHUCOPANA.  The incident, carried out by unidentified men, took place in the municipality of Remedios, department of Antioquia.

Incident

On March 2 of this year, Carlos Palacios was running errands in the urban centers of the municipalities of Segovia and Remedios, preparing later to travel to the rural sectors of these municipalities.

At approximately 11:00 am Carlos left the City Hall of Remedios, where he had been processing paperwork for a regional development project, and headed to the office of the Campesino Association of the Cimitarra River Valley (ACVC) located in the same municipality, when he realized an unknown subject had followed him. Without giving it much thought, he then went to a restaurant for lunch, then to a hairdresser, and finally back to City Hall.

During his route, the subject followed Carlos and waited outside each establishment until he left. At 4:00 pm outside of City Hall, a blue and black motorcycle picked up the olive-skinned man, who was wearing jeans, a white and orange striped shirt, and white and black tennis shoes. However, before leaving he took a picture of Carlos with his cell phone.

BORDERLANDS DELEGATION: “Doing the Right Thing for the Right Reason”

CPTnet
March 19, 2016
BORDERLANDS DELEGATION: “Doing the Right Thing for the Right Reason”

The USA-Mexican Border wall cuts a brown line through the vast desert terrain. It is visible for miles as it snakes to the horizon. This is the wall that Mexican and Central American migrants climb and jump over, sometimes four or five times, to return to an established life in the US or to start a new one they hope will be better than the life they left behind. In the eyes of the Border Patrol and US immigration policy, they are doing the wrong thing. Without the proper "documentos," they are breaking the law. Period.

But in their own eyes and those of their families, migrants from the south are doing the right thing for the right reason. Victor, a 30-year-old man we met in the Comedor, a migrant resource center operated by Kino Border in Nogales, Sonora, had just been deported from the US—dropped off by a bus at the border after serving 90 days in a private detention center for illegally crossing the border. Victor had lived in New York since he was 9 years old, worked in a restaurant, and had a wife and three children. He had returned to Mexico only briefly—for three hour—to see his mother before she died. After leaving his mother, he returned to the border to cross back into the country that he called home. He was caught by Border Patrol and convicted through Operation Streamline, a fast track means of processing illegal entry cases in groups of up to 70 migrants. He was sent to detention. He had tried to cross the border two previous times and had received shorter sentences—15 days and 30 days. He would try again, he said, though he would likely get a two year sentence next time. In his heart, he was doing the right thing for the right reason. It was really the only thing he could imagine doing.

Prayers for Peacemakers, March 17, 2016

We give thanks for the peacemakers-in-training in Iraqi Kurdistan, who recently passed the halfway mark of their training. We ask for endurance and fortitude for all involved in this training, as the group shares skills, learns history, and experiments with peacemaking and justice-seeking in this specific context.

*Epixil for Palm Sunday, March 20, 2016 Sixth Sunday in Lent
Trainees in Kurdistan experiment with a "hassle line"
Trainees in Kurdistan experiment with a "hassle line"
Isaiah 43:19
I am about to do a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.

I gave my back to those who struck me, and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard; I did not hide my face from insult and spitting.
The Lord GOD helps me; therefore I have not been disgraced; therefore I have set my face like flint, and I know that I shall not be put to shame;
he who vindicates me is near. Who will contend with me? Let us stand up together. Who are my adversaries? Let them confront me.
Isaiah 50:6-8

*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary readings.

CPT-EUROPE: "Sinking in the Sea and Walking for a Better World"

CPTnet
March 17, 2016
CPT-Europe: "Sinking in the Sea and Walking for a Better World"
By Ronbir Mohammad

(This article is the first in a new series of reflections: "The Border is Everywhere.")

 

In the summer of 2013, I walked with a group of refugees and allies from Malmö in the South of Sweden to Stockholm, the Swedish capital, as part of what we called “Aylstafetten.” We wished to transform Sweden to a country where refugees would be treated as human beings. Many of the refugees walking with us had no legal status and were “without papers.” For many of them, it was the first time experiencing solidarity from so many white Europeans.

As we moved in the capital amidst its power dynamics, some of those same dynamics were reproduced among the walkers, whether we wanted it or not. Some of us were white Swedes, others non-white Swedes born in Sweden, some non-white Swedes born outside Sweden who had acquired citizenship, others refugees with residence permits, and some refugees lacking residence permits but present in the country legally. The most vulnerable were refugees without papers who could be captured at any time and deported to “their countries”.

But during the walk we were equals. Whether we were swimming in the blue lakes of Sweden, walking past the small red houses in the countryside, or handing out leaflets and shouting slogans, we were equals. We were equals when we enjoyed the tasty Afghan food our fellow comrades made, or when we were singing, reciting poetry, and giving each other massages. We were comrades. During the month we walked, conflicts broke out and were solved. Stories of love, jealousy, tears, and laughter. The solidarity between the walkers was so strong that sometimes, as I was simply walking along and smoking, my heart was so filled with joy I wanted to shed tears.

IRAQI KURDISTAN: February 2016 Newsletter

in:

CPT Iraqi Kurdistan Newsletter - February 2016


FEBRUARY 2016

Iraqi Kurdistan

CPT 2016 trainees in Iraqi Kurdistan organised a public action to show solidarity with unpaid government workers in Kurdistan. The government has not paid the employees for last 5-6 months, so the workers are facing a very difficult situation now.

The trainees team envisioned the event to be held in Azadi Park in Sulaimani, Iraqi Kurdistan on Feb 19 th 2016. However, authorities denied approval for this action.

CPT trainees decided to perform it on the CPT office`s rooftop and capture it on video to share with you all.

To watch the movie, click here:
public action movie



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