Archive

September 29th, 2016

CPT INTERNATIONAL: Applications sought for Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Project Support Coordinator postion

 

Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) is accepting expressions of interest for the position of IPS Project Support Coordinator 

Participants in the 2015 Anishinaabe Waterwalk against the Energy East pipeline

Team: Administrative Team

Reports to: Program Director

Status: Stipended, half-time, 20 hours/week

Stipend: $1,000 USD/mo

Location: Turtle Island  (Canada–preferred—or United States)

Start Date: December 1st, 2016

Application Deadline: October 30, 2016

Position Purpose: This half-time (20 hours/week) position supports CPT’s Indigenous People Solidarity Program efforts to amplify the voices of and support Indigenous nations, communities and movements in Turtle Island seeking justice and defending lands against corporate and government exploitation, as well as a commitment to undoing colonialism in churches.   

September 28th

Prayers for Peacemakers September 28, 2016

Prayers for Peacemakers September 28, 2016

Pray for the people of Grassy Narrows.  A recently published report by Japanese scientists noted that almost everyone they tested in the community, young and old were showing some sign of mercury poisoning.  Additionally, Health Canada is withholding the results of blood tests they performed on newborns in Grassy Narrows for mercury poisoning between 1978 and 1992.  Pray that those with the power to address this environmental racism will find it unacceptable. 

*Epixel for Peacemakers  October 2, 2016 

O LORD, how long shall I cry for help, and you will not listen?

Or cry to you "Violence!" and you will not save?

Why do you make me see wrong-doing and look at trouble? Destruction and violence are before me; 

strife and contention arise.

So the law becomes slack and justice never prevails. The wicked surround the righteous--

 therefore judgment comes forth perverted. Hakkakuk 1:2-4

 
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing  with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary
 readings.

September 27th

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON): A week in photos 20-26 September 2016

Immoral, Illegal Annexation Underway  

Pictured here: CPT delegates from Serbia, India, and the US visit Al Bowereh, a neighborhood facing increasing encroachment, violence, and harassment by Israeli Jewish settlers seeking to link the Kiryat Arbat settlement with a nearby outpost.
(September 24, 2016)

September 26th

Mediterranean: On watch

The waves crashed on the stony beach. Out in the water of the Aegean Sea, between the Island of Lesvos and the coast of Turkey, the lights of coast guard boats and an occasional fishing boat could be seen in the moonless night. Two of our team joined members of the Emergency Rescue Centre International (ERCI) team as they started their evening all-night vigil to watch for and assist with passengers in refugee boats if they arrive at this area of the island. 

Night-vision binoculars were on hand.  An orange tarp was removed from a stack of blankets, kept for the warmth of the volunteers.  Wooden pallets for seating had been set up around a mound of rocks, where the group would light a campfire during the colder months of the year. During the dryer months of the summer there are regulations against open fires.

The rhythmic sound of the waves gave a backdrop for meditating, and we had plenty of time for getting to know each other. Though some did nap during the early hours of the morning, several participants always remained awake and alert to respond if a boat came. Other clusters of ERCI workers were holding similar at a couple other locations around the island where boats might arrive from Turkey. 

September 23rd

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON): A week in photos 13-19 September 2016

 

Random Act of Oppression 

Pictured here: An Israeli border police searches a Palestinian student's bag at Salaymeh checkpoint, disrupting his journey home after school. After taking this photo the border policeman told CPTers: "No pictures here!" 
(September 19, 2016)

September 22nd

Mediterranean: On Borders, Cooks, and Farmers

 

Massom* is young–I’d guess about 30, likely a bit younger. He’s one of the refugees who like to interact with the Greek organizers and the ever-changing group of international volunteers, practicing his English and helping out around the camp. This is a self-organized camp for some of the most vulnerable refugees who have arrived at the island of Lesvos, and Massom interacts with others here in ways that, for a variety of valid reasons, not many others are as apt to do. He’s there with a dustpan if he sees you sweeping. He helps to unload the deliveries of produce from area farmers into the room where we organize daily distributions. He’s all about making tea for anyone who wants it, anytime—his excuse to come and go often from the kitchen. He frequently succumbs, with great compassion, to the demands of little Myriam, a curly-headed toddler essentially on her own and dependent on the kindness of fellow residents and volunteers for the attention her mother—who suffers from severe depression—is unable to provide with much regularity. Massom enjoys staying close to the food scene, many times a week serving our communal lunch.

September 21st

Prayers for Peacemakers, September 21, 2016

Prayers for Peacemakers, September 21, 2016

Give thanks for the Muslim villagers of Dipre and the Christian villagers of Kashkawa in Iraqi Kurdistan who have supported each other over the years during Turkish cross-border bombings.  Dipre was most affected in the most recent round of bombings, and the Kashkawa villagers gave the villagers of Dipre the keys to their homes, so they could find refuge more easily.

*Epixel for Peacemakers September 25, 2016 
Children in Dipre village
Happy are those whose help is the God of Jacob, whose hope is in the LORD their God,
who made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them; who keeps faith forever;
who executes justice for the oppressed; who gives food to the hungry. The LORD sets the prisoners
 free;

the LORD opens the eyes of the blind. The LORD lifts up those who are bowed down; the LORD
 loves the righteous.

 The LORD watches over the strangers; he upholds the orphan and the widow, but the way of the
 wicked he brings to ruin. Psalm 146:5-9
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from the upcoming Sunday's
Revised Common Lectionary readings.

September 20th

MEDITERRANEAN: Forty-four years in prison for teenage refugee caught in smuggling web


He bent his head down momentarily and then raised it to brace himself for the verdict and the sentence. “Guilty.”

“Forty-four years in prison,” a staggering reality for a teenage refugee, who thought he would be released because of his age and background. All his dreams and hopes for his life, wiped away at the stroke of the judge’s pen. His only hope now is in the appeals process, which often results in greatly reducing the sentence.

We were stunned.  After visiting him in the jail the day before the trial, and hearing the agonizing story of his family fleeing death threats in their home country, I felt a deep pain and grief.

His crime: human smuggling. He had driven the small dinghy boat transporting forty other refugees from Turkey to Lesvos, Greece in order to pay for his family’s passage and was caught by the Greek coast guards.

September 19th

September 16th

MEDITERRANEAN: What the authorities don’t want you to see in Moria refugee camp

 

“You come go. Come, go. I Syrian Kurdish. Moria, no good. I, Germany. I love you Germany! Munich. Berlin. Dortmund.”

This was the rap from a thin energetic man who joined us as we walked along the fence outside the Moria refugee camp. Four members of the team and two volunteers from Pikpa were there for an impromptu look around. The young man indicated with a gesture that I should put away the camera for now, that he had a better location to shoot from. He also let us know the police might stop us if they saw us shooting pictures.

We had just passed the food carts and makeshift cantinas outside the camp that serve the residents who have fulfilled their initial twenty-five-day mandatory detention and vetting, and who are now free to come and go in the daytime through the gate. Most have no other place to go, and not enough money if they could. They cannot, without papers, rent cars or apartments, or stay in hotels on the island. It is illegal to give them a ride.