Archive

CPT INTERNATIONAL: CPT Seeks Psychosocial Care Coordinator


 Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) is accepting expressions of interest for the full-time position of: Psychosocial Care Coordinator.  

Team: Independent Consultant accountable to CPT’s Administrative Team

Reports to Program Director

Terms: Independent Consultant, full-time, 40 hours/week, three-year appointment

Compensation: up to $24,000 USD annually

Location: flexible; international travel required

Start Date:  January 1, 2017

Application Deadline: November 30, 2016

Please send resumé and statement of motivation to: program@cpt.org. Full job description available upon request.

 

October 28th

AL-KHALIL (HEBRON): A week in photos, 18-24 October 2016

 

Soldier: "This is my land"

Pictured here: Israeli soldiers told a Palestinian family, who had just finished harvesting their olives and were enjoying a picnic after the work day, that they should have asked for permission to harvest on their own land. The soldier told a CPTer, when questioned about their uninvited and armed presence, that "this is my land and this is my gun."
(October 22, 2016)

October 27th

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES SOLIDARITY: All the way to the top--CPT Steering Committee endorses UNDRIP (United Nations Declaration of Rights of Indigenous Peoples)


We have described to you a mountain. We have shown you a path to the top. We call on you to do the climbing-Judge Murray Sinclair (Commissioner for Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission)

One spring day, CPT Iraqi Kurdistan team climbed a Kurdish mountain. Our partners planned the day and, at the beginning of the path, villagers came out to wave at us as we began the trek. Our vegetarian teammate graciously carried the pot of meat for the barbeque. We thought it made sense to hike partway and then lighten our load by burning the wood to cook the chicken, which we would eat with all the other food we hauled.  Although we thought we knew how to do this, it became apparent that despite our good intentions, we had no idea how the day would go. When we wanted to stop, our Kurdish partners told us to keep going— all the way to the top! 

The trail was a goat track with stones and holes in the way. We had to clamber over large rocks in the pathway. It would have been easy to turn an ankle or to fall off the side. Yet our partners told us that our goal was the top ridge, when finally we could rest, put down the burdens of the meat pot, firewood and a huge stack of bread and have a feast together. 

Now CPT is again climbing a mountain—the one described by Judge Murray Sinclair at the end of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in Canada through which the world was exposed to the reality and horrors of 150 years of residential schools in Canada. The commission spent six years traveling to different parts of Canada to hear the testimony of approximately six thousand Indigenous people. They heard of children as young as three years taken away from their families and placed in residential schools to assimilate them into European settler society—a policy Justice Sinclair would declare “cultural genocide.” As a response, the commissioners of the TRC laid out ninety-four calls to action that communities and institutions on Indigenous lands can take to work for reconciliation. 

October 26th

Prayers for Peacemakers, October 26, 2016

Prayers for Peacemakers, October 26, 2016

Pray for the teachers and other public servants in Iraqi Kurdistan who have not receive salaries for months and are on strike.  Pray also for the activists and organizers facing persecution and violence from the Kurdish Regional Government authorities. 

*Epixel for Peacemakers October 30, 2016 
O LORD, how long shall I cry for help, and you will not listen? Or cry to you "Violence!" and you will not save?
Why do you make me see wrong-doing and look at trouble? Destruction and violence are before me; strife
 and contention arise.

So the law becomes slack and justice never prevails. The wicked surround the righteous-- therefore judgment
 comes forth perverted. Habakkuk 1:2-4
 
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary readings.

October 25th

MEDITERRANEAN: A garden in the heart of a child

 

Photo by Lesvos Solidarity

It’s morning in the camp. Humanity Crew, an organization of translators, comes by to pick up a vanload of Pikpa residents to take them to Moria detention center for the day. They are going for interviews and to fill out paperwork related to appeals for asylum or relocation. One woman approaches, asking if they can take her to the hospital. She has an appointment to have stitches removed from her bandaged hand. Other men and women have gathered under the pavilion to wait for the daily food distribution to begin. A tween-age girl from the Congo is slouching in a plastic chair with her hands over her eyes near to where I am watering one of the two communal gardens. I am trying to determine where to place the hose for the most effective irrigation.

This is Pikpa, an oasis in the desert of Fortress Europe. It is an open camp for refugees run by our partners, the nonprofit Lesvos Solidarity Network (formerly, Village of All Together). It is a safe and humane camp, standing in stark contrast to the detention centers operated by European security forces and the Greek military. On Lesvos, these are Moria, housing (imprisoning really) about 3,000 refugees, and Kara Tepe, with about 700 refugees. At Pikpa currently, eighty-nine residents (out of a capacity for 100) live in wooden cabins and canvas tents under the shade of tall pines. They have access to fresh produce and other wholesome food, clothing, medical aid, clean lavatories, language classes, and kindergarten for their children. Pikpa serves the most vulnerable: the disabled, sick, pregnant, and families of shipwreck victims.

October 24th

COLOMBIA REFLECTION: ‘It was a very sad day’--the narrow defeat of the peace referendum

Photo by Marian DeCouto

On Monday, September 26, 2016, I flew from Canada back to Colombia more excited than usual. After four years of negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), Colombia had finally reached a deal, which they would officially ratify that very day. 

As I began boarding the plane I saw a cameraman from the CBC news, and my heart fluttered with expectation. Upon landing in Bogotá, I could feel the energy buzzing through the exceptionally long line at customs. I quickly ran downtown to catch the festivities in the main square. Although the official signing was taking place in Cartagena, a historic walled city on the Caribbean coast where Colombia gained its independence, there were tens of thousands of people gathered in the capital to watch the live feed on big screens set up in the square.

I wasn’t prepared for the emotions that overcame me (and the goosebumps!) as I watched a parade of diverse Colombians celebrating this historic day. My friend Carolina turned to me to tell me that I will tell my kids and grandkids about this day. I cried tears of joy when the FARC commander asked for forgiveness from all of the victims and when the president of Colombia declared that the 52-year war was finally over. It was a day filled with hope, and an excitement to continue to work for a just peace on the horizon.

October 21st

October 20th

CPT INTERNATIONAL: Full-time Indigenous Peoples Solidarity field team member sought

 

Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) is accepting expressions of interest for the position of: Full-time Field Team Member.  All members of CPT’s Peacemaker Corps and qualified people from outside the corps are eligible to apply.

Team: Indigenous Peoples Solidarity (IPS)

Reports to Project Support Coordinator

Status: Full-time, stipended, three year term

Stipend: $1000US/month (independent living – no “team house”)

Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada) – Turtle Island

Start Date: December 1, 2017

October 19th

Prayers for Peacemakers, October 19, 2016

Prayers for Peacemakers, October 19, 2016

Pray for the young men of Hebron, Palestine who wish to worship in the Ibrahimi Mosque on Friday.  The Israeli military has banned men between the ages of fifteen and thirty-five from attending Friday noon prayers. 

*Epixel for Peacemakers October 23, 2016

He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and
 regarded others with contempt:

"Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector.
The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, 'God, I thank you that I am not like other people: 
thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector.

I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.'
But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast
 and saying, 'God, be merciful to me, a sinner!'

I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other;
 for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted." Luke 18:9-14
 
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary readings.

October 18th

MEDITERRANEAN REFLECTION: Give and take--distributing watermelon on Lesvos

 

Aside from the thick wall of heat glomming on to my body as I walk into the uncooled space of the camp kitchen where I am scheduled to spend the next four hours, the large mound of watermelon stacked in crumpled plastic crates on the floor grabs my attention first.

I thought I would try to stay within my comfort zone the first morning in the refugee camp. I volunteer for the job of food distribution, receive a knife and am told to start quartering the watermelons lengthwise. Who brings this watermelon here? Do they come every day? Are they from local farmers? How many should I cut? Nobody–of the handful of volunteers standing around finishing their coffees–knows. All I get, for sure, is that I need to split a few of the long quarters in half for the smaller families and individuals.

I take a hefty melon from the pile in the corner and set it on my cutting board. My hands sense a sort of magical energy tension at the point just before the knife-edge touches the watermelon, and it splits willingly. It cracks open with rough edges, creating an uneven topographical surface of ripe, red flesh on each half. Working with another volunteer, a young man from Berlin, we smile each time this happens, but otherwise, wordlessly fill a plastic crate, arranging the wedges so they will rise with reasonable stability just over the edges.