Kurdistan

IRAQI KURDISTAN NEWSLETTER: October 2016--Turkish bombing, government corruption, teachers' demonstrations and more!

 
Updates from Hemin and his family
Hemin is a human rights activist whom CPT accompanied for more than three weeks. Hemin was beaten by the security forces in the city of Erbil; his head and eyebrows were shaved. He managed to come to the city of Sulaimani, he then asked CPT to accompany him and his family. CPT visited his family in the city of Erbil where no one was able to visit them or speak to them, because they were threatened by the security forces. Hemin and his family had no choice but to leave their home and move to the city of Sulaimani. After two weeks of living in fear, his family managed to move to the city of Sulaimani. 

Read CPT's full report to learn more about Hemin and his family
CPTers welcoming Hemin's family to the city of Sulaimani. Photo by Julie Brown

IRAQI KURDISTAN: “We are not going to leave; this is our home and our land it belongs to us.”

They keep drinking their tea while the Turkish war planes are hovering in the sky above their heads." How often does this happen?" I ask pointing to the sky.

"I don't know, it depends, sometimes six, sometimes seven days a week; it's now a part of our daily lives." Kak Kaninya Barchun, village leader of Muruke (wearing the blue shirt in the picture) says while continuing to sip his tea.

Kak Kaninya explaining their situation to our team member Latif. Photo by Kasia Protz

IRAQI KURDISTAN: “We feel we are living in a jungle”--bombardments and land seizures in Dinarte

Our team recently visited the villages of Kashkawa, Muruke and Chame Rabate in Dinarte subdistrict of Akre. Most of those who are living there struggle with Turkish bombardments and/or the seizure of their land by politically-connected authorities.

We visited them in order to know more about their life under the Turkish bombardment. When we arrived Yousif, a villager living in Kashkawa, along with other villagers and the village leader, warmly received us.  Yousif told us it has been awhile since the last bombardment from Turkey.   However, they are still affected by it. “Our houses are damaged and our children and families are traumatized by the former bombings.” We witnessed holes in the walls of houses and pieces of bombs on the ground.

Yousif showing the team his damaged house. Photo by Kasia Protz

Prayers for Peacemakers, October 26, 2016

Prayers for Peacemakers, October 26, 2016

Pray for the teachers and other public servants in Iraqi Kurdistan who have not receive salaries for months and are on strike.  Pray also for the activists and organizers facing persecution and violence from the Kurdish Regional Government authorities. 

*Epixel for Peacemakers October 30, 2016 
O LORD, how long shall I cry for help, and you will not listen? Or cry to you "Violence!" and you will not save?
Why do you make me see wrong-doing and look at trouble? Destruction and violence are before me; strife
 and contention arise.

So the law becomes slack and justice never prevails. The wicked surround the righteous-- therefore judgment
 comes forth perverted. Habakkuk 1:2-4
 
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary readings.

IRAQI KURDISTAN: “They gave us the keys to their homes.” Christian and Muslim villages help each other during bombing attacks.

Asmar with our team member Julie Brown. Photo: Peggy Gish.

Seventy-year-old Asmar, grabbed my hand and welcomed us enthusiastically into the home she shares with her son and village leader, Khan Avdal Muhammed Sdia, his wife, Bilmas, and their children, in the village of Dipre, nestled in the mountains in the Dinarta sub-district in Iraqi Kurdistan. As we drank tea and ate almonds and cashews from their trees, they told our team about the recent round of bombing of their village on May 20, 2016. 

IRAQI KURDISTAN: You can say we lost our lives--Turkish bombing of Sergali village

Hasni Islam and his son show team members Peggy and Mohammed damage to buildings in Sergali. Photo by Julie Brown.

“Back in 1991, Turkey bombed our village of Sergali so heavily that we left the area,” Hasni Islam, the village leader, told our team.  He pointed north to the mountain behind which their old village had once stood.  “Because of the ongoing war between Turkey and the PKK (Kurdistan Worker’s Party) we couldn’t return to the village area, and so moved to this site and established it as our new village. But now, two months ago (June 2016), Turkey bombed around the village here, and half of the families fled again and scattered to other towns. The other half has no other place to go or the financial means to leave, so are still here, even though they are afraid.” At one time the village included 350 families, but now there are only forty.

IRAQI KURDISTAN: What peace looks like here

 

Weza village located near the Iranian border in Iraqi Kurdistan. Photo by: Peggy Gish.

 “Is this the village of Weza?” I asked my teammate, not believing what I was seeing. This did not look like the same village our team visited in June 2010. Weza, nestled in the mountains of northeastern Iraqi Kurdistan and close to the Iranian border, looked bigger.  Fields were larger and greener and the houses in better repair.  Residents, we spoke to said that even though they know in the back of their mind that danger could return to their village, they feel more relaxed. Tourists are once again coming into the area for vacations, to enjoy the beautiful views and the milder summer temperatures.

Six years ago, in June 2010, we sat in this same village, with the uncle of fourteen-year-old Basoz, as he told us about his niece’s tragic death three weeks earlier.  A rocket had exploded near Basoz while she was preparing tea for the rest of the family who were working in their fields.  Her twenty-year-old cousin, with her at the time, was not physically injured, but was severely traumatized.  The uncle, describing the situation there, told us, “Over the last ten days, more than 200 rockets have exploded around our village.  People here are terrified, and many have left.”

IRAQI KURDISTAN: July 2016 Newsletter--Border bombings, AVP training, what peace looks like and more!

Border Bombings

No Place to Hide

By Julie Brown
One of the CPT partner communities in the Allana Gully impacted by Iranian cross border bombings into Iraqi Kurdistan. Photo by: Julie Brown.
"When the bombing starts, where do you hide?" That is what I asked Sulltan.
"There is no place.  Behind rocks, wherever we can. We all just run in every direction. Everyone has to find their own place.  Even the children."

The last shelling started on June 23rd at 10am and did not stop until after noon.  The farmer said over 160 bombs fell on the small area in those two hours.  After it was over, many animals had been killed and three children were injured.  It was this story that we heard in detail as we documented the events of that day.

In the Choman District of Iraqi Kurdistan High in the mountains near the Iranian border lies the Allana Gully.  It was here that CPT visited after hearing reports of a recent cross border shelling from Iran. The drive through the mountains to this remote area was slow. The road is an unpaved rocky path that hangs on the sides of very steep mountain ledges. In many places it is so narrow that the wheels of our vehicle came dangerously close to sliding off the edge.

Prayers for Peacemakers, August 17, 2016

Prayers for Peacemakers, August 17, 2016

Pray for the villagers who are suffering from the impacts of Turkish and Iranian cross-border bombing in Iraqi-Kurdistan with almost no attention from the world community.

*Epixel for Peacemakers  August 21, 2016 
In you, O LORD, I take refuge; let me never be put to shame.

 In your righteousness deliver me and rescue me; incline your ear to me and save me.

Be to me a rock of refuge, a strong fortress, to save me, for you are my rock and my fortress.

Rescue me, O my God, from the hand of the wicked, from the grasp of the unjust and cruel.

For you, O Lord, are my hope, my trust, O LORD, from my youth. Psalm 71:1-5
 
*epixel: a snapshot-epistle to the churches related to and appearing  with a text from the upcoming Sunday's Revised Common Lectionary readings.