Christian Peacemaker Teams - Turn your Faith into Action for Peace https://cpt.org/ en Prayers for Peacemakers 27 January 2021 Aegean Migrant Solidarity https://cpt.org/cptnet/2021/01/26/prayers-peacemakers-27-january-2021-aegean-migrant-solidarity <span>Prayers for Peacemakers 27 January 2021 Aegean Migrant Solidarity</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/63" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hannah</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/26/2021 - 09:56</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="886" src="/sites/default/files/PHOTO-2021-01-25-11-45-29.jpg" width="720" /></p> <p>Pray for the safety of people at risk on Europe's borders.</p> <p>This winter, the expected harsh weather conditions will make survival very difficult for people living in the new camp on Lesvos, known as Moria 2.0. The camp, which was built right next to the sea, floods with every rainfall. A few days ago it snowed, leaving the migrants to experience severe cold since there are no facilities or infrastructure for heating in most of the camp.</p> <p>At the same time, many people continue to cross the sea borders, even in the heart of winter. Some have been forcibly and illegally pushed back to Turkey by the Greek Coast Guard and FRONTEX. Others have been shipwrecked and lost in the waves of the Aegean Sea. Those who managed to reach a Greek Island are at risk of losing their lives from the cold, like the 30-year-old Somali man who died on 18 January 2021 on a secluded shore in Lesvos after his boat reached the land.</p> <p>Pray for a safe haven for all who need it in this inhospitable land called Europe.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1422" hreflang="en">Prayers</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1445" hreflang="en">Lesvos</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1402" hreflang="en">Europe</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 26 Jan 2021 15:56:31 +0000 Hannah 12466 at https://cpt.org "They Tried to Bury Us, They Didn't Know We Were Seeds." https://cpt.org/cptnet/2021/01/21/they-tried-bury-us-they-didnt-know-we-were-seeds <span>&quot;They Tried to Bury Us, They Didn&#039;t Know We Were Seeds.&quot;</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Thu, 01/21/2021 - 09:20</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="1333" src="/sites/default/files/2021-01/Palestine_samud.jpg" width="1867" /></p> <p><strong>By Mona El Zuhairi</strong></p> <p>For seventy-two years the Israeli occupation has tried to bury Palestinians, literally and figuratively, attempting to extinguish their dreams in every possible way.</p> <p>The horrors of the occupation have left no stone unturned. When you meet a Palestinian, you either meet a refugee, a mourning parent, a displaced family, a family of a prisoner, an amputee, the list goes on. However, although the occupation attempts to reduce Palestinians to numbers and labels, when you meet a Palestinian you will also meet an artist, a dancer, a poet, a doctor, and so much more.</p> <p>By living under occupation and carrying the weight of this burden from one generation to another, Palestinians learned how to live, rise and achieve. People who live under constant oppression and long-lasting occupation always find their silver lining.</p> <p>Due to the COVID-19 crisis and the restrictions on travel, CPT Palestine is now relying on local Palestinian volunteers to keep the project running. Of course, documenting Israeli human rights abuses as a Palestinian involves a much higher risk. But these CPTers, all in their twenties, believe they are part of the change that needs to happen in their community.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Five local team members start their daily work around 6:30am, monitoring checkpoints to make sure students arrive safely to their schools. They manage to get up every day, regardless of the harassment they experience while passing the Israeli checkpoints in order to monitor and document.</p> <p>They were asked what allows them to continue amidst this unjust situation, what makes them wake up every day to stand at a military checkpoint knowing that they won't see an immediate result for their work?</p> <p>Tarteel has hope that a new reality is possible. "I'm looking for peace within myself and the outside world. When I see myself laughing with my family, friends, mates and the kids at the checkpoints, I see that we Palestinians want to live in peace, we just need better conditions!"</p> <p>Ahmad draws strength from the children with “smiley faces and their heads held high after they pass the checkpoints."</p> <p>Abdallah makes a point of "smiling to the children and wishing them a great day before they cross the checkpoint to go to school. This makes me believe that maybe this small act will help them to start a good day despite all the difficulties"</p> <p>"Monitoring checkpoints also includes a humanitarian service,” says Ameera. “At first it was difficult to work at checkpoints because of the soldiers’ behaviour and the body searches, as well as watching children throw stones, but gradually the children became happy when they saw us and smiled at us, and missed us when we were not there".</p> <p>Resilience in Palestine is not a choice; it is a necessity. Palestinians endure from generation to generation by being born into different shapes of sumud, a steadfastness where “the individual has to be resilient to stay and not to leave their place, position or community". [1]</p> <p>Palestinians cross borders and generations, with a belief, like Tarteel, that "I'm working for a change and that is what keeps me going! The dream of a better future for myself and the coming generation".</p> <p>In the end, oppressors need to understand that they can't bury people thriving for life and freedom, because the oppressed will always plant their seeds, knowing there will be a season for blooming.</p> <p>______________________</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;[1] Social ecology of resilience and Sumud of Palestinians, Mohammad Marie An-Najah National University, Palestine Ben Hannigan and Aled Jones Cardiff University, UK, 2016</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1415" hreflang="en">Palestine</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 21 Jan 2021 15:20:52 +0000 Caldwell 12465 at https://cpt.org Stop and Pray https://cpt.org/cptnet/2021/01/20/stop-and-pray <span>Stop and Pray</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/63" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hannah</span></span> <span>Wed, 01/20/2021 - 03:36</span> <div><p>20 January 2021</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/Oakflat.JPG" width="800" /></p> <p>by Carol Rose</p> <p>In a recent <a href="http://apache-stronghold.com/take-action.html">video,</a> Wendsler Nosie, member of the Apache Stronghold, spiritual leader and Land Defender at Chi'chil Bildagoteel (Oak Flat), challenged viewers to become aware of the land as you travel and ask permission to enter into different land formations as you pass through. Between Tucson and Oak Flats, the land changes many times. Down to the river, up over and through the foothills, through the high desert, through rocky places, through devastated mining places.&nbsp;</p> <p>As I travelled to Oak Flat for the vigil on 15 January, I stopped to pray as Wendsler suggested. It was a very different way of arriving. I noticed the land so much more and the birds and the plants. There is a section of desert where there are ancient elders, grandparent saguaros with so many limbs that you can't count them at a glance. I needed to stop and give thanks for safe passage and then ask permission to enter the next area.&nbsp;</p> <p>Once at Oak Flat, I noticed that the Apache were busy with other things, so I set up my tent and sat down on the picnic table to pray. I had rewritten the prayer used in many countries by CPT, the litany of resistance. I also prayed a prayer by Jennifer Shrock of Mennonite Creation Care Network, adapted just for this day. When I finished, I sat and just took it in—the spirit of this place and God so alive here. A whole family of incredibly bright blue birds emerged from a small manzanita bush in front of me and disappeared into one of the ancient Oaks.&nbsp;</p> <p>Later Wendsler, Nayine, and Vanessa, with others, took a group of us to the plateau behind the campground and took us on a short walk to see the petroglyphs, a flock or herd of every creature, including people, headed all in the same direction on a rock face. Wendsler talked about the roots of capitalism as evil, which attached itself to the people and the land, coming with the settlers.</p> <p>Wendsler also talked about the victory of their brilliant legal strategy.&nbsp; Based on the Santa Fe Treaty of 1853, the Apache now have a lien on this land. Therefore, unless the U.S. government can prove ownership in court, they cannot sell or give it away. There is a court date on 27 January that we pray will also establish an injunction and upcoming hearings on the Apache suit based on religious rights.</p> <p>The struggle for Oak Flat comes at a time when the US Forest Service in Arizona has complied with the outgoing administration and mining corporation rather than the calls of the land and the people. Thus they issued a rushed Final Environmental Impact Statement on 15 January, which would give the US Forest Service the power to carry out the land swap with Resolution Copper in 55 days.&nbsp;</p> <p>"But the lien is like a giant Apache shield over Oak Flat, protecting it at least until the entire case is all over," announced Apache Stronghold lawyer Michael Nixon. "Including all appeals to the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court, Apache Treaty Land ownership, Breach of Trust, and Freedom of Religion. Oak Flat is Apache Holy Land."</p> <p><a href="http://users.neo.registeredsite.com/8/3/2/11897238/assets/FOR_IMMEDIATE_RELEASE_January_15_2021.docx.pdf">Read the full press release from Apache Stronghold&nbsp;</a></p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1484" hreflang="en">Turtle Island Solidarity Network</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1430" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 20 Jan 2021 09:36:45 +0000 Hannah 12464 at https://cpt.org Prayers for Peacemakers 20 January 2021 Colombia https://cpt.org/cptnet/2021/01/19/prayers-peacemakers-20-january-2021-colombia <span>Prayers for Peacemakers 20 January 2021 Colombia</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/63" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hannah</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/19/2021 - 08:03</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="1074" src="/sites/default/files/English.jpg" width="800" /></p> <p>Accompanying those who accompany<br /> <br /> Today, we want to exalt and honor those who accompany us in our work of accompanying. Those who accompany us in our day-to-day lives and sustain us with love. Perhaps we have not thanked them enough, perhaps because we take them for granted. But the truth is that we have lacked to say with greater vehemence that to achieve our work of accompanying, as a team, we have been equally accompanied and supported by animals.<br /> <br /> Yes, animals have been the ones who have given us the possibility of entering many regions, especially when rainy season hits or fear looms. They guide us on the paths and protect us from some dangers. Without a doubt, animals surround our lives and help us to recharge ourselves with love. Including in our homes, in each CPT house where they accompany us or where they arrive looking for food or shelter, especially in these confusing and turbulent times.<br /> <br /> We pray for their lives and appreciate the good with which we have been and are blessed through their love.</p> <blockquote> <p><br /> <em>The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated - Mahatma Gandhi</em></p> </blockquote> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1422" hreflang="en">Prayers</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1399" hreflang="en">Colombia</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 19 Jan 2021 14:03:26 +0000 Hannah 12463 at https://cpt.org The phoenix needs to take his time https://cpt.org/cptnet/2021/01/13/phoenix-needs-take-his-time <span>The phoenix needs to take his time</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Wed, 01/13/2021 - 13:14</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="531" src="/sites/default/files/2021-01/idomeni.jpg" width="800" /></p> <p><strong>By Runbir Serkepkani</strong></p> <p>We met in the mud of Idomeni in March 2016. He was skinny and had a light beard. He spoke modified Moroccan Arabic, skipping the Amazigh, French and Spanish words and replacing them with standard Arabic ones so that we from the Peninsula would understand him. He spoke quickly as if someone was after him. He took deep puffs from his cigarettes like each one of them would be his last. He had lived chasing an uncertain destination for two years, travelling through closed borders full of landmines.</p> <p>He was one of the three thousand migrants who had recently crossed the border into Northern Macedonia on foot and were pushed back by the army, robbed, beaten and then thrown a whole day's worth of walking from the Idomeni border camp on the Greek side of the border. They collectively challenged the barriers that EU states had put in their way and were collectively humiliated and robbed of their freedom of movement.</p> <p>The second place where I met him was in Micro Dassos, a small village close to Idomeni. He was living in a house rented by a loosely organized group of anarchists and other solidarity people who cooked thousands of meals for migrants in huge pots every day.</p> <p>He was almost always speaking. The only time he was quiet was in the morning, just after he woke up. He sat on the doorstep with a big cup of coffee beside him, holding a cigarette between two fingers of his right hand. He dragged on it as if the bricks of his soul were vanishing every second, and the cigarette smoke was holding the walls of his soul together, replacing the vanishing pieces. He would not respond to your 'good morning,' he would not return your smile, he would not answer your 'how did you sleep?' It was his grounding moment, when the phoenix of his soul was getting reborn from the ash of the dreams and shaking the dust from his wings.</p> <p>Then he stood up, refilled his coffee from the thermos in the middle of the courtyard, put some peanut butter on two slices of bread and then joined the table with the rest of us. Then he started speaking. He would acknowledge everyone around the table and share some laughter with the group around him. I still do not know which place in Morocco he came from or what kind of life he had before starting his journey. Somehow he never gave any space for questions. Sometimes digging for answers is to put your dagger in someone's living skin. Sometimes asking a question is lighting a fire on the fuse, which will explode the equilibrium of one's soul.</p> <p>We had beers and cigarettes in the evening and visited police stations where the authorities had put teenagers in so-called" protection custody". We provided independent information about what was next in a time when Europe's external and internal borders were being closed ever more tightly to prevent the freedom of movement of migrants. He stirred the food pots the whole day. He interpreted for the prison group when my Arabic was not enough, and we had to call him and disrupt him from whatever he was doing. He would distribute food to migrants who were in the forests around Idomeni, hiding from the police. Meanwhile, he tried to get away from the hell of captivity along with 12,000 migrants who were in the Idomeni camp.</p> <p>The third place where I met him was in Leipzig in September 2017. After the Greek government evicted Idomeni in May 2016 and the authorities forcibly moved people to different camps throughout Greece, he got on a bike, put panniers on it, camouflaged himself with proper cyclist clothes and a helmet, and started biking towards Germany. People in solidarity hosted him along the way, and he had to cycle up many mountain roads to avoid border police. He then went straight to the German authorities on his own terms to apply for asylum, after crossing the border and having a beer and a cigarette.</p> <p>Not much had changed in him when I met him in Leipzig. The people around him were the same people who were around him in Idomeni. He was proud of defeating all those militarized borders in his personal war for his freedom of movement riding on a bicycle, pretending to be a long tour cyclist. Reaching the "destination" had not made him less talkative. Instead of a doorstep, he would sit in the garden of the squatted house where he lived, smoke his cigarette and drink his coffee in silence. Our friends told me that he had asthma and some other illnesses and that the doctor has forbidden him from smoking and drinking. I did get worried.&nbsp;</p> <p>But I never told him about my worries because I knew he would ride up that mountain as well, on his own terms and in his own time. The phoenix needs to take his time to shake ash from his wings.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1486" hreflang="en">Aegean Migrant Solidarity</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 13 Jan 2021 19:14:43 +0000 Caldwell 12462 at https://cpt.org Prayers for Peacemakers 13 January 2021 Turtle Island https://cpt.org/cptnet/2021/01/12/prayers-peacemakers-13-january-2021-turtle-island <span>Prayers for Peacemakers 13 January 2021 Turtle Island</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/63" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hannah</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/12/2021 - 10:13</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="448" src="/sites/default/files/giniw.jpg" width="800" /></p> <h6>Photo from Facebook: Giniw Collective</h6> <p style="line-height:1.38; background-color:#ffffff"><span style="font-size:10pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">We ask for prayers first for our Mother Earth and our sacred water which is our life blood. We ask for prayers for a cessation to the raping, murdering and killing of our mother by a "wendigo spirit" of greed and corruption which is manifesting itself in the development of an oil pipeline. This pipeline will carry tar sands oil through sacred water, wetlands, wild rice beds and forests to increase the profits of a Canadian corporation.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.38; background-color:#ffffff"><span style="font-size:10pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#222222"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">We ask for prayers for the Water Protectors as they risk their lives and their freedom by standing up to protect our Mother Earth and all of creation threatened by the black snake and the poison it carries. We ask for prayers for allies and friends to take a stand in a good way for our Mother Earth under the leadership of the Indigenous people of Turtle Island. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1422" hreflang="en">Prayers</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1484" hreflang="en">Turtle Island Solidarity Network</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1430" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 12 Jan 2021 16:13:38 +0000 Hannah 12461 at https://cpt.org Prayers for Peacemakers 6 January 2021 Iraqi Kurdistan https://cpt.org/cptnet/2021/01/05/prayers-peacemakers-6-january-2021-iraqi-kurdistan <span>Prayers for Peacemakers 6 January 2021 Iraqi Kurdistan</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/63" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hannah</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/05/2021 - 10:09</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="522" src="/sites/default/files/Family%20of%20Awat%20Hassan%20who%20CPT-IK%20accompanied%20in%202017%20walks%20in%20front%20of%20a%20large%20crowd%20of%20teachers%20who%20demand%20that%20their%20salaries%20be%20paid.jpg" width="800" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:12pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:'Liberation Serif'"><span style="color:#0e101a"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:italic"><span style="text-decoration:none">Today we pray that the new year brings the changes that CPT's partners in Iraqi Kurdistan desire and hope for so much: life without the threat of bombardment and freedom without fear to stand up against oppression.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:12pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:'Liberation Serif'"><span style="color:#0e101a"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">The coming of a new year gives us a fresh opportunity to dream and imagine what our world could look like without the ever-present oppression and such diverse manifestations of violence.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:12pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:'Liberation Serif'"><span style="color:#0e101a"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Let's envision together the lives of Kurdish and Assyrian farmers and shepherds without Turkish drones, bombs and military bases.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:12pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:'Liberation Serif'"><span style="color:#0e101a"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Let's imagine the joy of Sherwan Sherwani's family, the Badinan Prisoners' families, and the families of all others </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://cptaction.org/free-the-prisoners/" style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:12pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:'Liberation Serif'"><span style="color:#4a6ee0"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><span style="-webkit-text-decoration-skip:none"><span style="text-decoration-skip-ink:none">imprisoned for speaking the truth and organizing for civil rights</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span style="font-size:12pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:'Liberation Serif'"><span style="color:#0e101a"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none"> when they welcome their loved ones home.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.2"><span style="font-size:12pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:'Liberation Serif'"><span style="color:#0e101a"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">What will we feel and become when our world transforms to embrace the diversity of the human family and to live justly and peaceably with all creation?&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:'Liberation Serif'"><span style="color:#0e101a"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">As our partners are not giving up, we continue to walk alongside. Thank you for being part of this journey also in 2021.&nbsp; </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1406" hreflang="en">Iraq</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1408" hreflang="en">Kurdistan</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1422" hreflang="en">Prayers</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 05 Jan 2021 16:09:36 +0000 Hannah 12460 at https://cpt.org Prayers for Peacemakers 30 December 2020 US/Mexico Borderlands https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/12/30/prayers-peacemakers-30-december-2020-usmexico-borderlands <span>Prayers for Peacemakers 30 December 2020 US/Mexico Borderlands</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/63" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hannah</span></span> <span>Wed, 12/30/2020 - 09:46</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="456" src="/sites/default/files/HOB3.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This month marks the 20th anniversary of the Healing Our Borders Vigil in Douglas, Arizona.&nbsp; The vigil remembers the people who have died in the Cochise County desert – where Douglas is located – while attempting to enter the United States.&nbsp; There are now over 300 crosses representing these lost lives.&nbsp; Mark Adams, one of the co-founders of the vigil, has said that the spiritual discipline of calling the names of those who have died is one way that we remain hopeful while living and working at the US/Mexican border.</p> <ul> <li>Pray for all those who have died in the desert.</li> <li>Give thanks for their lives of bravery that they were willing to risk everything to help their families.</li> <li>Pray for comfort for the families who lost a loved one.</li> <li>Ask for safety for those who are still traveling in the desert.</li> <li>Pray that US government officials might change the policies that cause so many people to die.</li> <li>Celebrate the faithfulness of those who continue to remember those who have died.</li> </ul> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1422" hreflang="en">Prayers</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1430" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1409" hreflang="en">Mexico</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:46:47 +0000 Hannah 12459 at https://cpt.org Walk Humbly: Seeking Indigenous Rights in Contested Paths https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/12/28/walk-humbly-seeking-indigenous-rights-contested-paths <span>Walk Humbly: Seeking Indigenous Rights in Contested Paths</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/63" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Hannah</span></span> <span>Mon, 12/28/2020 - 09:38</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="533" src="/sites/default/files/2019%20-%20Bill%20C-262%20rally%20at%20Marpeck_0.jpg" width="800" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>by&nbsp;Steve Heinrichs<br /> Vice-Chair CPT Steering Committee<br /> Indigenous-Settler Relations director, Mennonite Church Canada</p> <p>Over the last five years, Christian Peacemaker Teams and Mennonite Church Canada worked tirelessly alongside Indigenous and ecumenical partners to support federal legislation to implement the UN <i>Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples</i>. And this month, at long last, the Canadian government tabled <i>Bill C-15: An act respecting the UN Declaration</i>.</p> <p>A consensus international human rights instrument, the <i>Declaration </i>was crafted by Indigenous peoples and representatives of nation-states over 25 years. It affirms the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples; rights that are “the minimum standards for the survival, dignity, and well-being of the Indigenous peoples of the world” (Article 43, UNDRIP).&nbsp;</p> <p>Since 2007 and the adoption of the <i>Declaration </i>by the UN General Assembly, Indigenous organizations like the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, the Haudenosaunee of Kanehsata:ke, and the Assembly of First Nations have called on Canada to create a national implementation plan for the <i>Declaration</i>, including a legislative framework. The UN special rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous peoples echoed this call, together with the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. Then, in 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada—a commission created by survivors of Indian Residential Schools—amplified it all the more by 1) naming the <i>Declaration </i>as the first principle in the path toward reconciliation, and 2) calling on the federal government</p> <blockquote> <p>… to fully adopt and implement the <i>United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples </i>as the framework for reconciliation… [and] develop a national action plan, strategies, and other concrete measures to achieve the goals of the <i>United Nations Declaration </i>(Calls to Action No. 43 &amp; 44).</p> </blockquote> <p>At the time, the Canadian government—then under Conservative leadership—was not interested in responding to this call. They had reluctantly affirmed the <i>Declaration </i>in 2010, following Australia and New Zealand’s lead and narrowly beating out the U.S. (the very last country in the world to support the <i>Declaration</i>). Canada’s affirmation, like that of these other settler colonies, stated that the <i>Declaration </i>was merely “aspirational” and had “no legal effect.”&nbsp;</p> <p>But the Liberals came to power in November 2015, promising a different way of relating to Indigenous peoples. In May 2016, Canada’s Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs told the world at the United Nations that Canada was now supporting the <i>Declaration </i>“without qualification.” Yet not long after, back in their “home and native land,” the federal government stated that Bill C-262—<i>Declaration</i> legislation put forward by Cree Member of Parliament Romeo Saganash and supported by Indigenous organizations, unions, churches and more—“was unworkable.” Why?&nbsp;</p> <p>We aren’t exactly sure. Perhaps the ruling Liberals were, at bottom, no different than their Conservative counterparts—ready to affirm “soft rights” around culture and language, but anxious about the <i>Declaration</i>’s “hard rights” on land and free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC). If Indigenous consent, and not mere consultation, is indeed recognized in Canadian law, everyone understands this will impact the State’s extractive economy. In general, Indigenous peoples are much more concerned about sustainability and relations of reciprocity with the land than settler society.&nbsp;</p> <p>And yet, 18 months later, the Government of Canada did an about-face and announced their support for Bill C-262. What happened? From what we can tell, people power won the day. We walked, we wrote, we fasted, and we rallied, putting pressure on specific members of the Liberal party to turn their vote. This persistent action and advocacy of grassroots coalitions forced a Government that was already publicly committed to reconciliation to support this <i>Declaration</i> legislation. It was pretty remarkable, and few people thought we could do it. But through strategic organizing and the building of enough public goodwill, we forced the Canadian government to say “Yes.”</p> <p>With the government’s backing, 262 made it through the halls of power to the finish line. But, right at the end, it “died on the order paper” due to Conservative opposition stall tactics. The date was June 21, 2018: National Indigenous Peoples Day. &nbsp;</p> <p>As the House broke for the summer, the Liberals promised to reintroduce government legislation to implement the <i>Declaration </i>if they were re-elected in the fall. And to their credit, they made good on that promise, tabling <a href="https://parl.ca/Content/Bills/432/Government/C-15/C-15_1/C-15_1.PDF">Bill C-15</a> this&nbsp;December. Yet we all know, this challenging journey of genuine respect for Indigenous rights is far from over. As C-15 makes its way through House and Senate, questions abound. Will C-15 achieve royal assent before a potential spring election? If C-15 becomes law, will Canada have a legislative framework that genuinely recognizes the <i>Declaration</i>’s international<i> </i>“standards for the survival, dignity, and well-being of Indigenous peoples”? And—most importantly—will the Crown abide by such standards, even as it struggles, right now, to honour existing laws and Supreme Court rulings that recognize various Indigenous rights?</p> <p>Many Indigenous colleagues are deeply skeptical—understandably so—believing that the government&nbsp; “will do as they have always done.” And some—a growing movement, including well-respected land defenders—don’t want C-15 to become law because they are certain that this legislation will <a href="https://idlenomore.ca/indigenous-networks-and-land-defenders-call-to-reject-bill-c-15/">domesticate Indigenous rights to Canada’s status quo</a> (i.e., current <a href="https://indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca/constitution_act_1982_section_35/">Section 35</a> interpretation). “It’s a Trojan horse,” says a good friend, “that will extinguish our rights!” At the same time, other Indigenous partners and organizations are hopeful and see Bill C-15 as a significant step towards right relationship. “It is a good day!” said Grand Chief Willie Littlechild (Cree) on the morning that the government announced C-15. “We are now on a path of true reconciliation, healing, peace, and justice.”&nbsp;</p> <p>The journey of justice is long. Indigenous peoples know that well, much more than middle-class settlers like me. And yet together we press on, taking strides for freedom—strides toward Indigenous self-determination and flourishing; strides toward Canadian decolonization. How to make those strides is not always clear to people of good heart and will. What looks hopeful to me appears as a trap to a trusted Indigenous friend. “You see a star blanket (in the promise of Bill C-15), I see a smallpox blanket”—he communicates to those following his Twitter account. And so we walk in different, even opposite directions, in this moment. That weighs heavy. But the reality is that the paths toward freedom, justice and peace are contested, and we don’t all see the same. And so as we <a href="http://www.commonword.ca/go/2217">listen to each other and the many that surround us</a>, as we debate what steps to take next (or not), we both pray – each in our own good way, and each to different effect - “in Your light, may <i>we </i>see light” (Psalm 36.9). Creator grant us courage. And above all, humility.&nbsp; &nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1484" hreflang="en">Turtle Island Solidarity Network</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1397" hreflang="en">Canada</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 28 Dec 2020 15:38:34 +0000 Hannah 12458 at https://cpt.org CPT INTERNATIONAL: Newsletter October - December, 2020 | Resilience https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/12/23/cpt-international-newsletter-october-december-2020-resilience <span>CPT INTERNATIONAL: Newsletter October - December, 2020 | Resilience</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Wed, 12/23/2020 - 11:23</span> <div><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="460px" src="https://indd.adobe.com/embed/1b6ef80a-19d7-4ff7-b381-aef0a342ecde?startpage=1&amp;allowFullscreen=true" style="border: 1px solid #777;" width="650px"></iframe></p> <p>Dear CPT Community,</p> <p>I vividly remember huddling around a cellphone with three teammates on a red woolen carpet in the mountains of northeast Iraqi Kurdistan. We were watching footage of sheep grazing on lush high mountain pastures. The camera then panned to the left, revealing a hole in the ground, a crater formed by aerial bombings the day before. As we watched the screen, Kak Bapir, a shepherd and a long time CPT partner, made it very clear: he will not leave Basta, his village, despite Turkey’s indiscriminate bombings throughout the region. His family has lived in the Pishdar region for generations and were key peacemakers during the civil war.</p> <p>Not much later, we hear explosions in the distance. Concerned for our safety, Kak Bapir urges us to leave. It would take us at least two hours of driving through winding, unpaved mountain roads to reach a “safe” area.</p> <p>I wonder what resilience means for Kak Bapir? In this issue, we’re pondering that question.</p> <p>There is a bit of resilience in all of us, particularly this year, as we try to find “normality” and grieve a loss impossible to fathom. Our way forward to collective and individual resiliency is dependent on the trust we build to take action together: to provide care, to demand change in systems that work against the common good, and to make sure it’s done in a way that addresses historical injustices.</p> <p>As 2020 winds down, we can point to moments of shock, when profits mattered over people and decision-makers rationalized the sacrificing of some lives.</p> <p>This brings me back to the question: what does resilience mean for Kak Bapir? What does resilience look like living through decades of aerial bombings? What is our role in building a world of resilient communities that create collective momentum to challenge injustice, oppression, and violence? Neither us nor Kak Bapir can do it alone; it is a burden that needs to be shared. We can’t comment and admire the resiliency of the oppressed if we are not ready to work to transform a reality that breeds the normalcy of resilience.</p> <p>We don’t need more resilience. We need justice.&nbsp;</p> <p>Happy holidays!&nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1400" hreflang="en">CPT International</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:23:14 +0000 Caldwell 12456 at https://cpt.org