Christian Peacemaker Teams - Turn your Faith into Action for Peace https://cpt.org/ en CPT INTERNATIONAL: Respect the Demands of the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Leaders & Land Defenders https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/01/15/cpt-international-respect-demands-wetsuweten-hereditary-leaders-land-defenders <span>CPT INTERNATIONAL: Respect the Demands of the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Leaders &amp; Land Defenders</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Wed, 01/15/2020 - 13:20</span> <div><p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="799" src="/sites/default/files/2019-12/200115_Wetsuweten.jpg" width="800" /></p> <h2 style="line-height: 1.295; margin-bottom: 11px;"><strong>Statement of Solidarity</strong></h2> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">January 15, 2020</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">Christian Peacemaker Teams stands with the Wet’suwet’en land defenders and all Indigenous people protecting their rights and the environmental integrity of their homelands. CPT is deeply concerned with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s maneuvers this week to establish an </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://aptnnews.ca/2020/01/13/pipeline-6/" style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#0563c1"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">“Exclusion Zone”</span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none"> on Wet’suwet’en territory— barring media and clan members from entering— which effectively reinstates&nbsp; a colonial and an apartheid era pass system.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">In the Exclusion Zone, located in the unceded territory of the Wet’suwet’en nation in northern British Columbia, the RCMP are enforcing a court injunction on behalf of a natural gas pipeline development. This injunction violates Wet’suwet’en law, the right to free, prior, and informed consent, and ignores the international condemnation by the </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://thenarwhal.ca/what-cost-are-human-rights-worth-un-calls-for-immediate-rcmp-withdrawal-in-wetsuweten-standoff/" style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#0563c1"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination</span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none"> to immediately suspend work on the Coastal GasLink pipeline until consent is obtained. Also concerning is the RCMP’s demonstrated willingness a year ago to use </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/20/canada-indigenous-land-defenders-police-documents" style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#0563c1"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">lethal force</span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none"> to enforce this injunction during a militarized raid on the Gimid’ten checkpoint.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">While the Coastal GasLink, RCMP and BC government may point to employment benefits and agreements with Wet’suwet’en band councils, Coastal GasLink does not have the consent of the hereditary clan leaders of their traditional territory.&nbsp; In accordance with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (principles the BC and Canadian governments have promised to uphold), prior consent needs to be obtained before any work can continue. As such, we echo the demands of all five Wet’suwet’en Clan Chiefs for:&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">1) Coastal GasLink needs to vacate the territory of the Wet’suwet’en.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">2) The Canadian and British Columbia governments must uphold its commitment to implement the Declaration.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">3) The RCMP must respect the rights of the hereditary chiefs and refrain from interfering with Wet’suwet’en law.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">As a nonviolent accompaniment organization, we have witnessed the threats and use of violent force against Indigenous peoples defending their rights from Burnt Church, to Elsipogtog, to Barriere Lake, to Caledonia, to Grassy Narrows. History is repeating itself in unceded Wet’suwet’en territory, an illustration of Canada’s ongoing settler colonial project that dispossesses Indigenous people from their land for settler industry and capital gains.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">The actions of RCMP, Coastal GasLink, and BC government make the rhetoric of reconciliation ring hollow.&nbsp; CPT is closely monitoring the events in Wet’suwet’en territory, and will continue to advocate to ensure Indigenous rights are upheld here and elsewhere across Turtle Island.&nbsp; </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="line-height:1.295; margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/alleyesonwetsuweten?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Ehashtag">&nbsp;#AllEyesOnWetsuweten</a>&nbsp; <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/wouldyoushootmetoo?lang=en">#WouldYouShootMeToo</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/wetsuwetenstrong?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Ehashtag">#WetsuwetenStrong</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1484" hreflang="en">Turtle Island Solidarity Network</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1397" hreflang="en">Canada</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 15 Jan 2020 19:20:50 +0000 Caldwell 12326 at https://cpt.org IRAQI KURDISTAN: "If you are faithful to your people"-Christians in Nahla Valley fear Turkish bombing will end their presence there https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/01/14/iraqi-kurdistan-if-you-are-faithful-your-people-christians-nahla-valley-fear <span>IRAQI KURDISTAN: &quot;If you are faithful to your people&quot;-Christians in Nahla Valley fear Turkish bombing will end their presence there</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/14/2020 - 10:03</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="466" src="/sites/default/files/sandiiii.jpg" width="700" /></p> <h6>Kak Sandi and other villagers from Chame Rabatke talking to CPT.</h6> <p>After driving for seven hours, we arrived in the Nahla valley at Chame Rabatke Village in the Duhok Governorate. Residents of this village are Assyrian Christians, and Ashur, a teacher hosted us.</p> <p>CPT Iraqi Kurdistan has visited the village of Chame Rabatke and surrounding villages before. For about six years these villages have lived under the bombardments of the Turkish government, which cause constant fear among the inhabitants.&nbsp;</p> <p>One of the members of Kak Ashur’s family told us, “In the past, the Turkish governments bombarded the mountains outside of the village. But now they are bombing near the village, causing great fear and traumatizing the people who live here. During the bombardments children cry and even the animals are scared.”</p> <p>These continuing attacks have forced the people of the village to leave their houses, fields, orchards, and livestock to flee to the cities. For generations their ancestors have lived in this place. Now their evacuation is threatening the continuation of a religious minority that has made this region its home.&nbsp;</p> <blockquote> <h2 class="text-align-right"><b>“We are not ready to let our children live here and suffer anymore.”</b></h2> </blockquote> <p>Another member of the family, Kak Ninos, shared his grief over evacuating the village.&nbsp; He told CPT that living in this situation is simply not safe anymore.&nbsp; “We are not ready to let our children live here and suffer anymore. This is our red line. Try to put yourselves in our place. What would you do as a father?”</p> <p>The condition of the road to and from the village is another safety concern and reason to flee. With deep potholes and jutting rocks, it is a dangerous and slow evacuation route when fleeing bombing. Even on more normal days it is a difficult journey for the children attempting to get to school.</p> <p>There is only one school in Chame Rabatke village. But it was closed in 2014, during the ISIS war, and has remained closed. That same year, it became a shelter for people who were displaced by that war.</p> <p><b>&nbsp;</b>Kak Ashur, who was a teacher in their elementary school, now must teach in another village and the rough roads make it too difficult for him to return home each day. “I am a teacher,” said Kak Ashur, “but I cannot go to my work. I have to teach somewhere else and cannot live in my village anymore”.</p> <p>The villagers of Chame Rabatke are distressed about the weak response of the Iraqi Government to their situation, and the silence of the Kurdistan Regional Government. They say that the Kurdistan Regional Government has no power to stop the bombardments by Turkey and Iran. All the Iraqi Government has done is publish a statement opposing the bombardments.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Kak Zaiya, the Mukhtar of the village, showing us a piece of shrapnel from the recent bombardment in Chame Rabatke." data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/59a826c98419c278e3fc88a4/1578814413084-AW40L6WW3X246051S724/ke17ZwdGBToddI8pDm48kC_zU2BfZ5ZIMnHNJenIZNVZw-zPPgdn4jUwVcJE1ZvWQUxwkmyExglNqGp0IvTJZUJFbgE-7XRK3dMEBRBhUpxijL9Wuh_4Ac8cZwXoOib6zhExuFZ5P2Nej7FDWJFPl4XcRpbKNAnqXKYQs44295g/kak+ziyaaaaa.jpg" /></p> <h6>Kak Zaiya, the Mukhtar of the village, showing us a piece of shrapnel from the recent bombardment in Chame Rabatke.</h6> <blockquote> <h2 class="text-align-right"><b>“What surprises me is that Turkey is a member of NATO, and they kill innocent people with U.S weapons. But the international community is silent.”</b></h2> </blockquote> <p>Kak Sandi, another member of Kak Ashur’s family, told us, “Bombardments caused the displacement of people from the villages to the cities. What surprises me is that Turkey is a member of NATO, and they kill innocent people with U.S weapons. But the international community is silent.”</p> <p>The villagers do not address only the governments, but also worldwide Christian communities. They welcome any organizations that will come to serve the people of Nahla Valley, which includes the Muslim village of Dupre. They say that as a Christian community, their possibility of dissolution is much higher than the other communities in this region.</p> <blockquote> <h2 class="text-align-right"><b>“If you are faithful to your own people, help us.”</b></h2> </blockquote> <p>Sargon speaks about the role of the global Christian community toward the villagers here. He said, “Some international churches gave 10,000 dollars to us, but this sum was not enough to pave the roads completely. We managed to fix part of the road, but after six months it was in disrepair again.” He added, “If you [Christians] are faithful to your own people, it is time to come and help us. We ask you to protect us and to try to stop the bombardments.”</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1406" hreflang="en">Iraq</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1408" hreflang="en">Kurdistan</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 14 Jan 2020 16:03:05 +0000 Kathy Kern 12324 at https://cpt.org CPT INTERNATIONAL: Christian Peacemaker Teams statement on U.S./Iranian tensions in Iraq  https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/01/10/cpt-international-christian-peacemaker-teams-statement-usiranian-tensions-iraq <span>CPT INTERNATIONAL: Christian Peacemaker Teams statement on U.S./Iranian tensions in Iraq </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Fri, 01/10/2020 - 07:45</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="197" src="/sites/default/files/reversedlogoCPT-black.jpg" width="408" /></p> <p><b>Christian Peacemaker Teams statement on U.S./Iranian tensions in Iraq&nbsp;</b></p> <p>January 9, 2020</p> <p>Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) calls for an immediate end to all U.S. and Iranian military escalations and a deepened commitment to diplomacy in the region. The world has watched as the governments of the United States and The Islamic Republic of Iran teeter on the brink of war as their armed forces launched drone strikes and ballistic missiles at various targets within the borders of Iraq.&nbsp;</p> <p>Diplomacy must be the highest priority for a pathway forward and lasting peace.</p> <p>Civilians are always the ones who carry the true cost of war. Over the years CPT has partnered with people who have been impacted directly by these conflicts.</p> <p>We have documented and amplified our partners’ experiences through the U.S. invasion of Iraq, the rise of the Islamic State, and the ongoing Turkish cross border bombings in Iraqi Kurdistan.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Through our programs in Iraqi Kurdistan and on Lesvos, Greece, we have witnessed that millions of people have fled due to violence. Civilians always pay the highest price including displacement, loss of livelihoods, destruction of agricultural lands, injury, trauma, and death.&nbsp;</p> <p>For too long the lands within Iraq and Iraqi Kurdistan have been used by various governments to stage various conflicts without consideration of those living there. This continued destabilization has fueled violence and prevented diverse peoples and communities from moving into a space of healing.</p> <p>Iraqi people demand that their land not be used by other countries to stage conflicts, and that the people of Iraq are not targeted and bombed.</p> <p>In support of this demand, CPT calls for continued de-escalation between the governments of the United States and the Islamic Republic of Iran as well as increased diplomacy. We cannot thrive as a world of communities if we constantly sit on the brink of additional wars.</p> <p>Please join in this effort to support peace by contacting your government representatives and urging them to engage in fostering nonviolent and diplomatic pathways in the region and around the globe.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1406" hreflang="en">Iraq</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1408" hreflang="en">Kurdistan</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1424" hreflang="en">Public Witness</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1430" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 10 Jan 2020 13:45:56 +0000 Kathy Kern 12323 at https://cpt.org U.S./MEXICO BORDERLANDS: Specifics and the Systems on the Border https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/01/06/usmexico-borderlands-specifics-and-systems-border <span>U.S./MEXICO BORDERLANDS: Specifics and the Systems on the Border</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Mon, 01/06/2020 - 13:04</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="450" src="/sites/default/files/IMG_0873-2.jpg" width="600" /></p> <h6>CPTers Carol Rose and Duane Ediger at the Migrant Resource Center, in Agua Prieta, Sonora.&nbsp;</h6> <p>by Carol Rose, CPT reservist</p> <p>It's easy to get lost in the daily needs, or discouraged by the magnitude of the crushing oppression on the U.S.-Mexico border.&nbsp; CPT's mission to back partners as a part of transforming violence and oppression requires us to attend to the details of the immediate situation, and to the sources of the oppression that grows into violence.&nbsp; Between the specifics and the systems, our presence and action strategically strengthen the forces for good.</p> <p>The systems that created the cauldron that is the U.S.-Mexico border include racism, cruel U.S. immigration policy, militarization of the border, decades of U.S. wars and other interventions throughout Latin America, punitive reactions to drug addiction and counterproductive responses to drug trafficking.&nbsp; All of this has contributed to creating space where organized crime flourishes and where migrants are caught between their violence and the wall, literally.</p> <p>Hundreds of asylum seekers are waiting, waiting in Agua Prieta, Mexico.&nbsp; They wait for their turn to present themselves at the port of entry to the United States.&nbsp; Many of them fled violence in their home communities by groups not unlike groups that are presently powers here in this small border town.</p> <p>After long and dangerous travels, when migrants arrive at the bus station here, they frequently face extortion.&nbsp; Some are kidnapped.&nbsp; Some disappear forever.&nbsp; If they make it from the bus station to the community of Mexican citizens who organize safer spaces and other assistance, then they join the long line of those who wait.&nbsp; There is room for some in the shelter.&nbsp; Most spend scarce resources renting space, vulnerable to organized crime while they wait.</p> <p>Asylum seekers who are next in line live immediately beside the border entry in a plastic tent with the lower portion of the 14 foot-tall border fence as one of its walls.&nbsp; They might be called after a day in the tent or after two weeks or more.&nbsp; The call might come first thing in the morning, at midday or late at night.&nbsp; Volunteers from the community and CPTers accompany the families to and from the tent and a migrant assistance center where they can clean up and get a break from the weather. &nbsp; Much of the year the tent is unbearably hot.&nbsp; This week it snowed.&nbsp; &nbsp;</p> <p>When representatives of the U.S. immigration system call them, they face many questions and much paperwork.&nbsp; Some are released to stay with loved ones somewhere in the U.S., pending their hearings.&nbsp; Others are sent to Juarez, Mexico, an even more dangerous border city, to wait for their hearing.&nbsp; Unless there are large shifts towards justice in the U.S. immigration system, regardless of the attacks they have experienced or the dangers they will face if they return, most will not receive asylum.</p> <p>Where are the leverage points for transformation?&nbsp; CPT presence brings direct support to migrants and to the courageous and hospitable people from both sides of this border who stand with them.&nbsp; It will take widespread organizing to transform U.S. government policies that attack and deny migrants and strengthen organized crime.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1396" hreflang="en">Borderlands</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1430" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1429" hreflang="en">Undoing Oppressions</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1409" hreflang="en">Mexico</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1413" hreflang="en">Migration</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 06 Jan 2020 19:04:35 +0000 Kathy Kern 12321 at https://cpt.org CPT INTERNATIONAL: Faith Statement on Escalating Violence with Iran https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/01/04/cpt-international-faith-statement-escalating-violence-iran <span>CPT INTERNATIONAL: Faith Statement on Escalating Violence with Iran</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Sat, 01/04/2020 - 12:59</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="450" src="/sites/default/files/IMG_0562.jpg" width="600" /></p> <h6>CPT Steering Committee member Tori Bateman (left) was among the CPTers who participated in the<br /> <a href="https://www.codepink.org/01042020">National Day of Action</a>&nbsp;in Washington, DC</h6> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Christian Peacemaker Teams is among&nbsp; 23 faith groups who have signed on to a statement condemning U.S. aggression towards Iran.</p> <blockquote> <p>We call on the Trump administration&nbsp; to end military escalation, and on Congress to refuse authorization for war with Iran.</p> <h3>As people of faith, we condemn the United States’ dangerous aggression towards Iran, including the assassination of Gen. Qassem Soleimani and the deployment of additional troops to the region. We urge the Administration to step back from the brink of war.</h3> <h3>Our faith communities see the futility of war, and its power to dehumanize. We know that human flourishing entails breaking cycles of violence, being courageous peacemakers, and focusing on the root causes of conflict. Violent conflict is a path of mutual destruction.</h3> <p>Instead, all actors must move forward in a way that upholds our shared, sacred human dignity:</p> <ul> <li>All parties must begin by re-humanizing each other without excusing unjust and violent actions.</li> <li>The U.S. Administration must halt violent attacks and military escalations. It must return to a diplomatic process, recognizing that lasting peace requires a commitment to the shared well-being of every human, from Iran to the United States and everywhere in between.</li> <li>The U.S. Congress must act to reassert its war powers by refusing authorization for war with Iran and related attacks, and to block funding for war with Iran.</li> <li>U.S. actions and strategy in the region must address the root causes of the conflict, such as distrust, trauma, economic resources, and political influence.</li> <li>All of us must support nonviolent creative actions of resistance to any unjust and violent actions.<br /> As communities of faith, we renounce the escalation of violence, and call on the United States to work towards lasting peace with Iran.<br /> &nbsp;</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Signed,<br /> American Friends Service Committee<br /> Center on Conscience and War<br /> Christian Peacemaker Teams<br /> Church of the Brethren Office of Peacebuilding and Policy Churches for Middle East Peace<br /> Coalition for Peace Action<br /> Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach Conference of Superiors of Men (Catholic)Congregation of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd, US Provinces Faith in Public Life<br /> Franciscan Action Network<br /> Friends Committee on National LegislationLeadership Conference of Women Religious<br /> Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns<br /> Mennonite Central Committee U.S.<br /> National Advocacy Center of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd National Campaign for a Peace Tax FundPresbyterian Church (USA)<br /> Provincial Council Clerics of St. Viator<br /> Sisters of Mercy of the Americas- Institute Leadership Team Unitarian Universalist Association<br /> United Church of Christ, Justice and Witness Ministries<br /> The United Methodist Church – General Board of Church and Society</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="750" src="/sites/default/files/IMG_0595.jpg" width="1000" /></p> </blockquote> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1400" hreflang="en">CPT International</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1430" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1424" hreflang="en">Public Witness</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1406" hreflang="en">Iraq</a></div> </div> </div> Sat, 04 Jan 2020 18:59:33 +0000 Kathy Kern 12320 at https://cpt.org BORDERLANDS REFLECTION: Holy Family seeks asylum https://cpt.org/cptnet/2019/12/31/borderlands-reflection-holy-family-seeks-asylum <span>BORDERLANDS REFLECTION: Holy Family seeks asylum</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Tue, 12/31/2019 - 11:10</span> <div><h6><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="450" src="/sites/default/files/IMG_0893.jpg" width="600" /><br /> Tent where asylum seekers wait to cross into the U.S.</h6> <p>by Carol Rose</p> <p>They dared to leave before they were killed.&nbsp; They dared to look for refuge in the belly of a beast that had a great part in creating the conditions of violence in their land.</p> <p>On the evening of Christmas Day, after months of travel and delay, a couple and their little baby were still waiting at the gate. They had been next in line in the tent set up for asylum seekers at the border for days and nights.&nbsp; They had shivered in the wind.&nbsp; They had received a Christmas feast from local supporters.&nbsp; They had been under constant surveillance by armed groups that might still threaten them.&nbsp; They had been accompanied here&nbsp;by CPTers Jack and Linda Knox, Carol Rose, and Duane Ediger. They had been accompanied by many others as well in those days.</p> <p>The forecast for the 26th&nbsp;was for rain.&nbsp; By the 28th, there might be snow.&nbsp; U.S. Border officials stood with little protection from the wind, but had a large space heater on the other side of the gate.&nbsp; However, they never seemed to know when those above them who made decisions would allow one more asylum-seeking family in.</p> <p>I wondered<i>:&nbsp; Was it a treacherous trek across the desert for Mary, Joseph and Jesus?&nbsp; Did they have to wait, shivering at the gates of Egypt, still vulnerable to attack by Herod?&nbsp; Were there people who stood with them from among their own people and among the oppressing nations?</i></p> <p>With great joy, this family got the call in the morning rain the day after Christmas.&nbsp; Excited jumps.&nbsp; Moments racing about to assure that all their things were collected in those few small bags.&nbsp; Hugs from those next in line and those of us accompanying.&nbsp; They crossed the border hoping against hope in this next step on the long journey towards a safe enough home.</p> <p>I wondered:<i>&nbsp; Who of my people will be the lucky ones to have this holy family as neighbors?</i></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="450" src="/sites/default/files/IMG_0873.jpg" width="600" /></p> <h6>CPTers Carol Rose and Duane Ediger at the Migrant Resource Center, in Agua Prieta, Sonora.&nbsp;</h6> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1396" hreflang="en">Borderlands</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1430" hreflang="en">United States</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1409" hreflang="en">Mexico</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 31 Dec 2019 17:10:11 +0000 Kathy Kern 12318 at https://cpt.org IRAQI KURDISTAN: “What hope is there for us?” Family of an 18-year-old killed in Iranian shelling seeks support to treat their wounded son https://cpt.org/cptnet/2019/12/23/iraqi-kurdistan-what-hope-there-us-family-18-year-old-killed-iranian-shelling <span>IRAQI KURDISTAN: “What hope is there for us?” Family of an 18-year-old killed in Iranian shelling seeks support to treat their wounded son</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Mon, 12/23/2019 - 10:16</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="316" src="/sites/default/files/Zeitun%20-%20Meeting%20between%20family%20and%20CPT.JPG" width="600" /></p> <h6>Zeitun’s family meets with members of CPT. Her father, Kak Qadr, stands in the right side of the photo.<br /> Ali, wounded by Iranian shells, sits in a wheelchair in the center of the photo next to his mother Khatu Bayan.<br /> Below: Zeitun Qadr was 18 years old when Iranian shelling ended her life on 10 July 2019.</h6> <p><br /> Zeitun was 18-years-old when an Iranian artillery bombardment ended her life. “She would have been graduating from a high school science program this year,” Zeitun’s father, Kak Qadr, told CPT.</p> <p>A few minutes past noon on 10 July 2019, Zeitun had just begun to serve lunch for herself and her two brothers, Sirwan (16-years-old) and Ali (21), when shells began to explode near the family’s cucumber and tomato fields in the area of the Barbzin heights in the sub-district of Sidakan. The three siblings stayed behind working in the field after the rest of the family left to attend a funeral in their hometown of Diana.</p> <p>According to local residents, Iranian forces bombarded the Barbzin area for over one hour with around 40 shells, one of which killed Zeitun and seriously wounded Ali and Sirwan. Doctors retrieved 16 pieces of shrapnel from Ali’s body. He lost one eye and sustained severe injuries to his leg and foot. A piece of shrapnel penetrated the elbow of Sirwan.</p> <p><img align="left" padding-right="10px" alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="548" src="/sites/default/files/2019-12/Zeitun%2BQadr.jpg" width="308" /></p> <p>Zeitun’s family, like many other Iraqi Kurdish families living in the border regions, split life between two homes. Zeitun and her siblings spent most of the year in the town of Diana where they could attend schools. During the warm months of the year the family took care of bees, fields, gardens and orchards near their village home of Bole, located in the fertile area of the Barbzin heights on the mountain slopes reaching the Iraq-Iran border. The production of honey and vegetables like cucumbers, onions and tomatoes, as well as peaches, apples, figs, and walnuts provided for an important portion of the family’s sustenance over the year.</p> <p>In 2016, the Democratic Party of Iranian Kurdistan (PDKI) began to use the area around Barbzin for guerilla operations against Iranian military forces stationed in bases and outposts on the mountain range over looking the village. Since then, the Iranian military has shelled this rich agricultural region that supports livelihoods of more than a hundred Kurdish families a number of times. The bombardments have <a href="https://cptik.org/reports-1/2017/10/17/civilian-impacts-of-renewed-turkish-and-iranian-cross-border-bombardments-">caused serious disruptions</a> during the months of busy farming activity, <a href="https://cptik.org/news-1/2018/8/28/raising-crops-in-midst-of-burned-village?rq=Iran">burned crops</a>, <a href="https://cptik.org/reflection">damaged houses, injured villagers</a> and <a href="https://cptik.org/reports-1/2019/9/24/turkish-and-iranian-cross-border-bombings-in-iraqi-kurdistan-2017-2019">displaced communities</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>“Our region has been bombed for a long time. In these days, with all kinds of modern technology, the military forces should be able to target soldiers and not civilians. My children did not look like PDKI soldiers,” Kak Qadr told members of CPT.</p> <p>The CPT-IK team met with Zeitun’s parents, Qadr and Bayan, four remaining siblings and two relatives in the family’s home in Diana on 22 November 2019. While serving tea and fruit, the family members shared with CPT details from the day of the bombardment and about their current situation. Sirwan showed CPT a healed shrapnel wound in the bend of his arm and that his fingers had recovered only partial mobility. Ali, unable to walk because of the injury, sat in a wheelchair.</p> <p>The family members told CPT that the office of Kurdistan’s President provided financial help for Ali’s treatment. However, the money they received was not enough to cover all the procedures and medicine and the family had to spend additional $20,000 USD. Ali needs further treatment, for which the family lacks resources.</p> <p>Kak Qadr said, “Even though Iran has not shelled our village lands since July, the Turkish warplanes bombed the area several times in the past months. We have lost our harvest because of the fires started by the bombs.”</p> <p>The family has sought financial assistance and asked for compensation from Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) ministries as well as from the Iranian embassy, so far with no response. One international organization and two German journalists visited them. The family said that they did not receive any assistance as a result of the visits.</p> <p>One member of the family asked CPTers, “Do you maybe know any organization that could send Ali abroad to get good treatment and a better life? There is no future for him in this country. He won’t be able to find work with his injuries.”</p> <p>Kak Qadr sighed, “All world saw pictures of the children in Rojava burned by chemical weapons.* If the world did not intervene to stop that what hope is there for us?”</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>* Kak Qadr refers to photographs of children with horrific burns caused presumably by white phosphorus which Turkish proxies allegedly used against civilians during their invasion of Rojava, northern Syria, in October 2019.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1408" hreflang="en">Kurdistan</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1406" hreflang="en">Iraq</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 23 Dec 2019 16:16:35 +0000 Kathy Kern 12316 at https://cpt.org Advent Reflection: Meet CPT Reservist Michael Himlie https://cpt.org/cptnet/2019/12/20/advent-reflection-meet-cpt-reservists-michael-himlie <span>Advent Reflection: Meet CPT Reservist Michael Himlie</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Fri, 12/20/2019 - 12:20</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="600" src="/sites/default/files/2019-12/MichaelHimlie_advent_0.jpg" width="800" /></p> <p><em>Christian Peacemaker Teams wish to celebrate this Advent season by sharing the reflections and experiences of CPTers who carry out the work of transforming oppression. </em></p> <p><em>Week to week, we will introduce you to a CPT Reservist who will share their story through the symbols of each Advent candle in honor of the season and invite you to take action to support transforming oppression.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> On this last Sunday of Advent, we explore the theme of Light.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="text-align-center"><em>****</em></p> <p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-12030f25-7fff-bca1-1bd3-6ee8752e727e"><strong>Tell us a bit about yourself:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">I am from Harmony, M.N., US, on Meskwaki land, Turtle Island. I am currently applying to graduate school programs, and am thankful to currently serve CPT as a Corps Rep on the Steering Committee. I love to do anything outside. I am a very active person at heart, but always have a good book with me as well.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What year did you join the CPT Corps? </strong>2017</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What motivated you to join CPT?</strong></p> <p>Since I was young, perhaps 11 or 12 years of age, I heard stories of CPTers engaging in the work. Regrettably, because I grew up in a very pro-U.S. military town, and was perplexed about, war, occupation, and exploitation, CPT was simply an alternative, ethical way to engage in these curiosities of mine. As I studied, learned and became more engaged, it became clear to me that the work of undoing oppressions and grassroots-supported work was central to the work of CPT and my being a part of it. I am still in a transformational time of being just as motivated to engage in the work of CPT that intrigued me as a child, but in an ongoing transformation of undoing oppressions work.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Which teams have you served on or how have you fulfilled your reservist duty?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">I joined CPT after university and joined the Palestine team after CPT’s intensive training. During my time on Palestine team, I was denied and banned and then went on to the Iraqi Kurdistan team for a short time. Prior to and post Palestine, I also served on the Lesvos program and have engaged in many speaking tours throughout North America/Turtle Island, and&nbsp; Europe. I have also spent a short time as a reservist on the Mexico/U.S. Borderlands program. Now I serve as a Corps Rep to CPT’s Steering Committee.&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr">Palestine: 2017-2018&nbsp;<br /> Lesvos: 2017/2019&nbsp;<br /> Iraqi Kurdistan: 2018&nbsp;<br /> Mexico/U.S. Borderlands: 2019</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>How you experience LIGHT while you work at transforming oppression in your CPT context:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Until about two weeks ago, I would have said that I do not regard light in any particular way specific to undoing oppressions. However, two weeks ago I was listening to a podcast that a friend and teammate told me about, hosted by Layla Saad. In this episode Layla has author and birth doula Latham Thomas on. They talked about many insightful topics, one being on the duality of darkness and light. They reflect that we are taught to define light ultimately as pure, as well as good, holy, and sacred, while darkness is evil, bad, defiant. Latham shares that how we are taught to think about darkness and light has been fraught with a sense of duality and layering race. We are taught to believe people are highly capable of leading us because they look a certain way, while someone who comes in different (darker) physical packaging does not “connect” to me because they are not what I was taught to believe purity looks like. The expression “this is a dark time” is common, but Latham reminds us that with all the words in the world, we can choose different words to describe bad times other than as “dark”.&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr">Latham goes on to say that we need the dark. We grow at night when we sleep; we see the stars and moon because of the darkness; babies grow in mothers’ wombs in darkness and are born into light. Darkness and light do not exist without one another. Given Latham’s experience and knowledge, I am working on noticing my internal, rooted beliefs about darkness and light, and working to experience the sacred beauty of darkness and light this season.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Please share a short prayer or reflection for Advent, which has helped guide/motivate/inspire/sustain your transforming oppression work:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Glennon Doyle said, “What carries on racism is not the KKKer, it’s the moderate who cares more about order than justice.” Just because I can name someone more racist than I does not mean I am deserving of a gold medal. Undoing oppressions work is a life long journey that is tested daily. Glennon also has an analogy that goes like this: if I carry a coffee cup filled with tea, and am bumped, tea will spill out of my coffee cup. Likewise, if I call myself a feminist and my teammate calls me out on sexist behavior and I become defensive in response, inside myself I have not done the proper, deep transformational work. It is our job as average beautiful moderate humans to do the life long work of undoing oppressions so that when we are bumped, we are the same justice loving people inside and out, nurturing a better world.</p> <div ltr="" style="border:3px; border-style:solid; border-color:#cc002b; padding: 1em;&gt;&lt;p dir="><strong>Take Action</strong> <p>In 2019, 106,711 migrants entered Europe by sea. 1,246 died at sea. The decision to seek refuge in a country that does not welcome you is a choice of life or death - a decision difficult to fathom by many, but yet one made by the 100,000 new migrants expected to arrive on Greece’s shore in 2020. The Greek government has chosen to adopt an aggressive policy to criminalize migrants, house them in inhumane conditions, and provide legal support that appears to be a farce, as CPT-Aegean Migrant Solidarity <strong><a href="https://dm-aegean.bordermonitoring.eu/2019/07/15/the-war-against-smuggling-incarcerating-the-marginalized/">reported</a></strong> earlier this year. Even those who provide humanitarian assistance to migrants are criminalized. Sarah Mardini&nbsp; and Seán Binder, both swimmers, are facing up to twenty five years in prison for rescuing migrants arriving by boat.</p> <p>This Advent, we invite you to join Amnesty International’s <a href="https://write.amnestyusa.org/cases/facing-jail-for-saving-lives/"><strong>‘Write a Letter, Change a Life’ </strong></a>campaign to demand that charges against Sarah and Seán be dropped. It is not a crime to save lives.</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1486" hreflang="en">Aegean Migrant Solidarity</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1402" hreflang="en">Europe</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 20 Dec 2019 18:20:34 +0000 Caldwell 12315 at https://cpt.org Advent Reflection: Meet CPT Reservists Sarah & Jonathan https://cpt.org/cptnet/2019/12/19/advent-reflection-meet-cpt-reservists-sarah-jonathan <span>Advent Reflection: Meet CPT Reservists Sarah &amp; Jonathan</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/19/2019 - 17:28</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/2019-12/191219_Sarah-Jonathan_advent.JPG" style="padding: 0px 15px;" width="600" /></p> <p><em>Christian Peacemaker Teams wish to celebrate this Advent season by sharing the reflections and experiences of CPTers who carry out the work of transforming oppression. </em></p> <p><em>Week to week, we will introduce you to a CPT Reservist who will share their story through the symbols of each Advent candle in honor of the season and invite you to take action to support transforming oppression.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> In preparation for the last Sunday of Advent, we explore the theme of Love.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="text-align-center"><em>****</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Tell us a bit about yourselves:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">We love people, the planet, and powerful peacemaking! Also we love ice cream, sunshine, and "building partnerships to transform violence and oppression." For real! We didn't just write that because it's CPT's mission statement. Like our time with CPT, this phrase continues to inform us as we work with many communities to deepen their spiritual activism. We met in 2013 through CPT work in Bethlehem. Sarah was Outreach Coordinator then and continued as CPT executive director through 2017. Jonathan was a Palestine team member, and after he was devastatingly denied entry to continue his on-the-ground work there he returned home, and advocated for Palestinian rights, connecting the Palestinian struggle for justice with local efforts to make positive change in the US. We married in 2018, and were Rotary Peace Fellowship scholars in Thailand and Southeast Asia for the first part of 2019. We returned to the beloved Midwest U.S. to help in the start-up phase of a program for people re-entering the community after incarceration. We currently live in Syracuse, New York (Haudenosaunee traditional territory) where Sarah is pursuing a joint PhD in Religion and Environmental Studies, and Jonathan organizes locally for decolonization, racial and economic justice, and a free Palestine.&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What year did you join CPT?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Sarah:</strong> 2010 as a Steering Committee member, 2012 as a Corps member.<br /> <strong>Jonathan:</strong> Summer 2012.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What motivated you to join CPT?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Jonathan:</strong> As a Palestinian-American Mennonite, CPT was an obvious choice because of its long and storied work in Palestine, as well as its roots with Anabaptists. Through my time with CPT I have come to appreciate deeply the undoing oppressions focus CPT brings to its work, as well as the many ways CPT has chosen to listen to and support local partners, even when that was not the most expedient choice. I really enjoy seeing other individuals in the CPT network as we travel around the world and our advocacy work overlaps.<br /> <strong>Sarah:</strong> I attended the CPT Peacemaker Congress in 2000 in Washington, DC. CPT Reservist Rich Meyer helped organize a carpool from my high school. This was such a moving and educational experience! My information got into CPT's database from that event, and I have received the newsletter ever since! I read it quarterly through college and years of ecological black feminist antiwar scholar-activism. Tim Nafziger recruited me to the Steering Committee while I was in seminary. Years later, I learned about a CPT position opening that could combine my passions of redistributive justice (a.k.a. fundraising), undoing oppressions, and frontline activist support. It has been a great honor to serve the organization, our partners, and our constituents in a variety of capacities over the years.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>How do you experience LOVE while you work at transforming oppression in your CPT context?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Justice is what love looks like in public&nbsp; --Cornell West.</p> <p dir="ltr">Just the other night we assisted student protesters at Syracuse University&nbsp; who were dismantling their sit-in/encampment site. They had just won a campaign for systemic reforms, in response to multiple incidences of racist hate speech on campus. The space was abuzz with joy, camaraderie, and LOVE. We reflected on what it felt like--a specific feeling that we experience in spaces where people come together to courageously create the world they want to see. It's the feeling we had at Standing Rock, in At-Tuwani, and the School of the Americas protest. It's a LOVE that is simultaneously gentle enough to extend compassion for the world, fierce enough to not retreat in the face of disappointment, overwhelm, and suffering, and expansive enough to champion the inherent dignity of ourselves and our opponents.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr">We lead three to five trainings a year for communities who are facing systemic oppression. In our training we do meaningful activities we learned over the years from many sources, including from CPT materials. Our trainings are best when we begin by building a foundation for the work we do in a deep sense of LOVE, and return to that LOVE when things get hard. We are committed to undoing oppressions because of the LOVE we have received, and feel for others.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Please share a short prayer or reflection for advent, which has helped guide/motivate/inspire/sustain your transforming oppression work:</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>A Franciscan Blessing</em> is one we love. We know so many radical Franciscan monks and nuns who, powered by liberating love and a sense of humor, have risked their lives for justice, leveraging their status to make a difference.</p> <p dir="ltr">May God bless you with a restless&nbsp;discomfort<br /> about easy answers, half-truths, and superficial relationships,<br /> so that you may seek truth boldly<br /> and love deep within your heart.</p> <p dir="ltr">May God bless you with holy&nbsp;anger<br /> at injustice, oppression, and exploitation of people,<br /> so that you may tirelessly work for justice, freedom, and peace among all people.</p> <p dir="ltr">May God bless you with the gift of&nbsp;tears<br /> to shed for those who suffer from pain, rejection, starvation, or the loss of all that they cherish,<br /> so that you may reach out your hand to comfort them and transform their pain into joy.</p> <p dir="ltr">May God bless you with enough&nbsp;foolishness<br /> to believe that you really can make a difference in this world,<br /> so that you are able to do what others claim cannot be done.</p> <div ltr="" style="border:3px; border-style:solid; border-color:#cc002b; padding: 1em;&gt;&lt;p dir="><strong>Take Action</strong> <p dir="ltr">Christian Peacemaker Teams invites you to <a href="https://bdsmovement.net/get-involved/get-active?fbclid=IwAR0uggv2qYPeaVtxtmuT34JUewJk10LtgRcAcNeRzxJpp4_22I_cPyfDMvY">get involved</a> in your <a href="https://bdsmovement.net/get-involved/join-a-bds-campaign">country</a>, to take action to support the Palestinian led, Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions campaign for freedom, justice and equality.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you are in the United States, <a href="https://washingtonmemo.org/portfolio/support-palestinian-childrens-rights/">call your representative</a> to support the <a href="https://nwttac.dci-palestine.org/">No Way to Treat a Child</a> campaign and H.R. 2407, the Promoting Human Rights for Palestinian Children Living Under Israeli Military Occupation Act - that demands an end to US support for Israeli military detention of children. Determine if they have signed the <a href="https://andylevin.house.gov/sites/andylevin.house.gov/files/112119%20Letter%20to%20SecState%20on%20Israeli%20settlements%20FINAL.pdf">Congressional letter</a>&nbsp; to Secretary of State Pompeo opposing his statement declaring that settlements are legal. Thank them if they have signed the letter and tell them to sign it if they have not.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1415" hreflang="en">Palestine</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1416" hreflang="en">al-Khalil (Hebron)</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 19 Dec 2019 23:28:48 +0000 Caldwell 12314 at https://cpt.org ANNOUNCEMENT: CPT-Lesvos is now Aegean Migrant Solidarity https://cpt.org/cptnet/2019/12/17/announcement-cpt-lesvos-now-aegean-migrant-solidarity <span>ANNOUNCEMENT: CPT-Lesvos is now Aegean Migrant Solidarity </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Tue, 12/17/2019 - 16:18</span> <div><p dir="ltr">Christian Peacemaker Teams - Lesvos is now Aegean Migrant Solidarity. The new name reflects the geographical location of our working area. Our work is not limited only to Lesvos Island but also includes other locations such as Chios Island, Athens, and the west coast of Turkey. Aegean Migrant Solidarity demonstrates a reference to the geographical scope of our work.</p> <p dir="ltr">Our inclusion of ‘Aegean’ makes reference to the history of the Aegean Sea as a migration point for different populations. This predates what is now known as the ‘refugee crisis.’ Many of the locals of the island are also the descendants of Aegean migrants from more than one hundred years ago. In the 1920’s, a forced population exchange made refugees of ethnic Greeks living on the Western coast of Turkey; they faced a lot of difficulty when they had to resettle on the island. Aegean Migrant Solidarity is more inclusive name, embracing and underlining the common ground between the old and new migrants of the island.</p> <p dir="ltr">The team prefers to use the word ‘migrant’ rather than ‘refugee,’ because on a daily basis we see people seeking shelter are divided into ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ claimants. European policies and rhetoric is focused on accepting those who are considered genuine (refugees) and driving out those who it claims, came simply for better opportunities (economic migrants). We reject this categorization and do not make such distinctions when working with communities.&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr">We chose the word ‘Solidarity’ because it easily leads into a conversation about the nature of our work, and provides a better opportunity to discuss CPT’s core values – ‘amplifying voices’, ‘accompaniment’, ‘undoing oppressions’ etc.&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr">The members of the team will present themselves as workers of Aegean Migrant Solidarity, while on social media: Facebook and Twitter, the team will use CPT- Aegean Migrant Solidarity.</p> <div ltr="" style="border:3px; border-style:solid; border-color:#cc002b; padding: 1em;&gt;&lt;p dir="><strong>Help us get to know you better. Fill out this quick two minute <a href="/survey">survey</a>.</strong></div> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1486" hreflang="en">Aegean Migrant Solidarity</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1402" hreflang="en">Europe</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1413" hreflang="en">Migration</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 17 Dec 2019 22:18:10 +0000 Caldwell 12306 at https://cpt.org