Christian Peacemaker Teams - Turn your Faith into Action for Peace https://cpt.org/ en Prayers for Peacemakers 3 June 2020 | US/Mexico Borderlands https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/06/03/prayers-peacemakers-3-june-2020-usmexico-borderlands <span>Prayers for Peacemakers 3 June 2020 | US/Mexico Borderlands</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/03/2020 - 12:21</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="766" src="/sites/default/files/2020-05/CAME%20Mother's%20Day.jpg" width="1280" /></p> <p>Please pray for all the migrant mothers who celebrated Mother’s Day on 10 May at the CAME (Centro de Atención al Migrante Exodus) shelter in Agua Prieta, Sonora and for the children who honored them. Pray that they might have courage and patience in this time of waiting. And let us give thanks for the volunteer mothers and donors who are helping the migrants at CAME.</p> <p>Traditionally, Mother’s Day in Mexico is a big event, and that tradition did not stop for the mothers at the CAME. On Mother’s Day the children held a celebration to show gratitude to the volunteer mothers and donors. Presently, there are about 30 people at the CAME migrant shelter who, so far, are safe from the double threats of coronavirus and Mexican organized crime.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1422" hreflang="en">Prayers</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1396" hreflang="en">Borderlands</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 03 Jun 2020 17:21:58 +0000 Caldwell 12366 at https://cpt.org Out of sight out of mind https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/05/15/out-sight-out-mind <span>Out of sight out of mind </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Fri, 05/15/2020 - 05:40</span> <div><p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="714" src="/sites/default/files/2020-05/Manners_200418_03272.jpg" width="1000" /></p> <h6 style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent none repeat scroll 0% 0%; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;">People wait in line for the daily ration of water in Shillong, India. Photo: Caldwell Manners</h6> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><strong>By Mona El Zuhairi</strong></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">A virus didn’t differentiate between race, gender, age or class; our systems did.</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">My colleague once told me, “Most white people have reached the point where they are blind to their privilege because they were born into institutional racism.” I would add that it is not only racism but institutionalized intersectional oppression. We live in an interconnected world; race is only one part of it.</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">In the last few weeks, many people have been surprised by two items publicized in the media:</span></p> <ul style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"> <li style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;; list-style-type:disc"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">Statistics that have shown black people in the U.S. have a higher rate per capita of COVID-19 diagnoses than white people</span></li> <li style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;; list-style-type:disc"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">Two French doctors who suggested testing COVID-19 vaccines in Africa.</span></li> </ul> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">Why are people surprised?&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">If I wanted to use&nbsp;</span><a class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtfLink" href="https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Piagets-Theory-of-Cognitive-Development_fig1_331461512" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;; color: #4a6ee0;" target="_blank"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;; color: #4a6ee0;">Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development</span></a><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">&nbsp;to assess the attitude of the majority of the adult world, especially in this time of Covid-19, most people would fall in the pre-occupational stage. This developmental stage represents children who are about 2-7 years old. Children in this stage act as though the world revolves around them and, exhibit behaviors in line with the proverb “out of sight, out of mind”.</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">White people believe that race is not part of how the world is divided anymore. They don’t see it anymore in restaurants or cinemas as people used to in the southern United States or South Africa. People of color have the same entrance now to public places, and they don’t see apartheid as clearly as it was historically.</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">But those examples of white supremacy heritage—the division and allotting inferior resources to people who are not white—are still ruling the world. How they manifest themselves has changed, but they are still operating.</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">For example, seventy-nine percent of African Americans had health coverage in 2009 compared to 88% of white Americans. (Russell, 2010)</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">According to the APM Research LAB “The COVID-19 mortality rate for Black Americans is 2.8 times higher than the rate for Asians, three times higher than the rate for Latinos, and 3.6 times higher than the rate for White Americans.”</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">In another example from China, in late January to mid-March in Guangzhou, local shops refused to provide service to black people as the percentage showed that 76% of the imported cases were from Africa. (Sun, 2020)</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">Regarding the white public reactions toward the French doctors&nbsp;</span><a class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtfLink" href="https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/04/racism-row-french-doctors-suggest-virus-vac" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;; color: #4a6ee0;" target="_blank"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;; color: #4a6ee0;">suggesting Covid vaccines be tested on Africans</span></a><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">: first, the responses were inadequate. I think white people need to start acting proactively instead of reactively toward racism. But the doctors' comments did not come out of the blue; it is a common practice by big pharmaceutical companies to maneuver around the ethics and regulations for financial reasons and not only in the face of COVID-19. In 2005, 40% of medical trials happened in developing countries. Africa attracts pharmaceutical trials for several reasons, including low access to quality healthcare, epidemiological transition, a fast-growing population, a rising middle class, and rapid economic growth. (</span><a class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtfLink" href="https://www.wemos.nl/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/JH_Wemos_Clinical" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;; color: #4a6ee0;" target="_blank"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;; color: #4a6ee0;">WEMOS, 2017</span></a><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">)</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;"><span data-preserver-spaces="true" style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;;">The time has come for everyone to rise-up and begin thinking and acting in proactive ways—not only against racism but against all types of oppression that divide the world based on absurd reasons.</span></p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="color: rgb(14, 16, 26); background: transparent; margin-top:0pt; margin-bottom:0pt;">&nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1400" hreflang="en">CPT International</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1429" hreflang="en">Undoing Oppressions</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 15 May 2020 10:40:16 +0000 Caldwell 12363 at https://cpt.org Prayers for Peacemakers, 13 May 2020 Colombia https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/05/13/prayers-peacemakers-13-may-2020-colombia <span>Prayers for Peacemakers, 13 May 2020 Colombia</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/13/2020 - 00:01</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="506" src="/sites/default/files/2020-05/PFP%20English.jpg" width="900" /></p> <p>Today, while some people wait at home, women caregivers and life-givers throughout our lands, cultivate with love, irrigate with perseverance, and patiently harvest the future of tomorrow.<br /> <br /> They provide food for their children, their nieces and nephews or grandchildren, but also, for ours. Food on the table has all the love of a woman. And isn't this the love of God?<br /> <br /> "Honor her for all that her hands have done, and let her works bring her praise at the city gate." - Proverbs 31-31</p> <p>--------------------</p> <p>This is part of CPT Colombia's new series #OracionesCampesinas or Prayers for Farmers. Do you have a prayer you would like to share with us? <a href="mailto:peacemakers@cpt.org?subject=Prayers for Farmers: Prayers for Peacemakers">Send it here.</a></p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1399" hreflang="en">Colombia</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1422" hreflang="en">Prayers</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 13 May 2020 05:01:12 +0000 Caldwell 12361 at https://cpt.org TURTLE ISLAND SOLIDARITY NETWORK: From the Frontlines of the Wet’suwet’en Struggle https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/05/03/frontlines-wetsuweten-struggle <span>TURTLE ISLAND SOLIDARITY NETWORK: From the Frontlines of the Wet’suwet’en Struggle</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Sun, 05/03/2020 - 07:59</span> <div><p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="1000" src="/sites/default/files/wetsuweten.jpg" width="1500" /></p> <p><strong>By Natalie Maxson</strong></p> <p>It was dark when we arrived at the Gidimt’en camp outside Houston, B.C., with a trunk full of groceries and winter camping gear for everyone to share. Chuck Wright and I made the twelve-hour road trip on behalf of CPT to the site at the 27-kilometre mark along Morice West Forest Service Road in response to an invitation from Wet’suwet’en leaders for legal observers. It was evening in early February, and the camp was lit with the glow of a bonfire. The sound of people chopping firewood filled the air.&nbsp;</p> <p>“This is bush life,” said one person while we were being oriented to the camp.</p> <p>“Where do you get your drinking water from?” I asked thirstily.</p> <p>“The river gives good water,” said one supporter. I hesitantly dipped my bottle into the Wedzin Kwa (Deep River) -- a point of contention between land defenders and Coastal GasLink (CGL), the company behind the disputed natural-gas pipeline. The water was pristine and refreshing, a far cry from what First Nations under boil-water advisories experience every day.&nbsp;</p> <p>Walking into the woods that first night to reach the outhouse, I stopped in my tracks. I had the distinct feeling I was being watched. I knew the RCMP checkpoint was only one kilometre away. But this visceral feeling of being watched was different and very close. I stopped on the snowy path, my gaze directed toward the trees, and I introduced myself. I declared my intentions for being in the territory: to monitor and document police behaviour, and to do no harm.There is a presence here. This land is sacred. During our week-long stay, moments of prayer and ceremony highlighted our time at Gidimt’en camp.&nbsp;</p> <p>_______________</p> <p><strong>Join Natalie for a live webinar on May, 5, 2020: <a href="https://cptaction.org/stories-from-the-frontlines-of-the-wetsuweten-resistance/">Stories from the frontlines of the Wet’suwet’en Resistance</a></strong></p> <p>On the first day at the camp, I noticed red dresses hung up along the road.&nbsp; The red dresses are reminders of the women and girls who have been killed or gone missing on the nearby “Highway of Tears” and express distress over the risk the CGL worker camp poses to women in this community. The 2019 report of the national inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls states that there is substantial evidence that links resource extraction projects with violence against Indigenous women and girls especially where worker camps or “man camps” are established.&nbsp;</p> <p>Being on this beautiful land and meeting the people on the frontlines has transformed my engagement from one of intellectual knowledge to a deeper spiritual and physical understanding. It’s one thing to read about the region: I was inspired by the landmark Delgamuukw court case, which found that Aboriginal land rights in the area had never been extinguished by Canadian occupation and hereditary chiefs continue to have title over their traditional territory (I first read this in 1998 as a university student). But it’s another to hear first-hand stories from people about what this territory means to them. In conversation with hereditary Chief Namoks during our stay, I learned that the camps set up and occupied along the Morice Forest Service road are historic village sites. He added that the proper archaeological assessments have not been done in the areas where CGL is scheduled to work. That same week he had been in talks with CGL and provincial government representatives and reflected, “We always suspected who was calling the shots, but these meetings were the first time I actually saw industry directing government officials what to do.”</p> <p>I met a nine week old baby with big, bright eyes who smiled when I said, “What do you think of all this? All this is for you and the children to come.” I later witnessed an elder confront the RCMP officers at the checkpoint that restricted people’s access to the territory state: “We’re not doing this for us. We’re defending the land for the children to come. Not just First Nations children, all children.”</p> <p>During our time at the camp, we witnessed the overwhelming presence of heavily armed police, tactical units, helicopters and drones to defend an injunction passed to protect Coastal GasLink’s pipeline project. We witnessed RCMP restrict and detain media reporting on the situation in the territory.&nbsp; Chuck and I were arrested on February 8 along with several others when the RCMP expanded their “exclusion zone” in the area, and were held in police custody for over two days.</p> <p>Canada has not heeded the call from the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination to suspend CGL’s work. The province of BC passed legislation to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in November 2019 but the province’s Premier, John Horgan, insists the pipeline will go ahead and that the application of UNDRIP will only be forward looking.&nbsp;</p> <p>It doesn’t matter how many apologies have been issued for residential schools, potlatch bans and other acts of oppression and genocide against Indigenous peoples when the reality on the ground says otherwise. This is why many are declaring, “Reconciliation is dead. Revolution is alive!”</p> <p>This movement to respect Indigenous rights, crystallized at this time by the Wet’suwet’en struggle, is an important opportunity for church and society to show up and demonstrate what justice could look like. Many churches have been committed to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s calls to action and hosting the Kairos Blanket Exercises to learn about Canada’s colonial history and their complicity in it. As we witness solidarity actions across Turtle Island (North America) in response to this struggle for Indigenous rights, faith communities have a real opportunity to step up and bravely engage in these issues, as places where people have a foundation of shared values and established relationships.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1484" hreflang="en">Turtle Island Solidarity Network</a></div> </div> </div> Sun, 03 May 2020 12:59:24 +0000 Caldwell 12358 at https://cpt.org COLOMBIA:Statement by Christian Peacemaker Teams Colombia Regarding the End of the Unilateral Ceasefire by the ELN https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/05/02/colombiastatement-christian-peacemaker-teams-colombia-regarding-end-unilateral <span>COLOMBIA:Statement by Christian Peacemaker Teams Colombia Regarding the End of the Unilateral Ceasefire by the ELN</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Sat, 05/02/2020 - 12:01</span> <div><p>2 May 2020</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="640" src="/sites/default/files/7177768_640x640.jpeg" width="640" /></p> <p><b>Statement by Christian Peacemaker Teams Colombia Regarding the End of the Unilateral Ceasefire by the ELN</b></p> <p>On 1 April of this year, the National Liberation Army— ELN announced a unilateral ceasefire in response to the great difficulty that Colombia faces today with the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p>The Conflict Analysis Resource Center (CERAC) stated that, in effect, the ELN suspended all its offensive military actions, and there was “a complete reduction in violence directly associated with the conflict between the ELN and the Colombian state force” which, without a doubt, was a great relief for the regions and communities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>After exactly one month and as it stipulated, on 30 April the ELN announced the end of its truce, thus indicating that beginning on 1 May, it was preparing to resume military actions.&nbsp;</p> <p>This is why Christian Peacemaker Teams Colombia—with a presence in the Middle Magdalena region for the past 20 years—joins our voice together with all the organizations and civil society that today see this decision with deep pain and frustration.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>We ask that the ELN prolong the ceasefire and maintain its willingness to dialogue for the achievement of peace, but we also call the Colombian State and all armed groups to an&nbsp;immediate ceasefire, to stop the incessant suffering caused by the armed conflict. Today, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is urgent to prioritize life and understand the need for a total suspension of its military operations.</p> <p>We also urge the National Government to resume the peace talks and prioritize a negotiated solution to the conflict.</p> <p>The suffering of the most vulnerable communities in this country cannot wait any longer. No more misfortunes must be added to this land. Life cannot continue to be sacrificed in the name of this violence that destroys us.</p> <p>#PorLaVidaAltoAlFuego&nbsp; #ForLifeCeasefire</p> <p>30 April 2020</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1399" hreflang="en">Colombia</a></div> </div> </div> Sat, 02 May 2020 17:01:07 +0000 Kathy Kern 12357 at https://cpt.org U.S./MEXICO BORDERLANDS: Those Bones Will Rise Again https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/04/24/usmexico-borderlands-those-bones-will-rise-again <span>U.S./MEXICO BORDERLANDS: Those Bones Will Rise Again</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Fri, 04/24/2020 - 12:01</span> <div><p>24 April 2020</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/IMG_1936%20copy.jpeg" width="700" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>by John Heid</p> <p><em>“The hand of Spirit came upon me and set me in the center of the plain that was now filled with bones. Spirit made me walk in every direction so that I could see how many were on the plain. How dry there were!” Ezekiel 37:1-2</em></p> <p>On Easter Saturday I accompanied a group of six humanitarian aid workers into a remote region of the Cabeza-Prieta National Wildlife Refuge. Our hope was to recover the remains of a man who had collapsed and died there last month. Numerous bodies have been found in this region since enhanced U.S. border enforcement began funneling people into austere parts of the desert. We walked into a vast plain not unlike the one Ezekiel was led to by the Spirit.</p> <p>Over two days we covered 25 miles in a valley where the bones lie largely unseen. We were unable to find this “no identificado” (unnamed one’s) remains even with specific directions. Animals and the elements of the Sonoran Desert can disappear a body rapidly. Still the effort was important. Sacred. Intention is what matters. He and all the untold numbers of people who lie here matter. Their spirits linger. Their story, their exodus, cries out to be told.</p> <p>Much of the world news is focused elsewhere today. Many people continue to cross the U.S.-Mexico border seeking refuge, asylum, a safe home. And many still die en route. Our search was a re-membering, which literally means putting together, not bones, but story. We cannot forget this man’s sacrifice. We cannot not put his disappearance and death into the larger context of the struggle for life. Was it coincidence that we sought him during Easter Week?</p> <p>The Spirit told Ezekiel to prophesy resurrection over the plain of bones. Our prophetic role is no less daunting: to keep these stories alive so that one day the walls of indifference, nationalism, and concrete will finally be broken down. This is what prophetic imagination looks like.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1396" hreflang="en">Borderlands</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 24 Apr 2020 17:01:41 +0000 Kathy Kern 12355 at https://cpt.org IRAQI KURDISTAN: What is it like to be displaced? https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/04/17/iraqi-kurdistan-what-it-be-displaced <span>IRAQI KURDISTAN: What is it like to be displaced?</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Fri, 04/17/2020 - 12:32</span> <div><p>17 April 2020</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="467" src="/sites/default/files/jajaj-2.jpg" width="700" /></p> <h6>CPT and people from Zewka village in front of Kak Hamad Ameen’s house in Qaladze.</h6> <p>Zewka is one example among hundreds of villages in Iraqi Kurdistan that have become casualties of the political tension and greed of their neighboring countries, Turkey and Iran. For the past thirty years, Turkey and Iran’s air and land assaults have led to the death and injury of hundreds of innocent civilians and the displacement of thousands of villagers who live along their borders. Their governments use the “war against terror” as an excuse to massacre people from the villages located at their borders.&nbsp; They violate the Iraqi Kurdistan region’s border and threaten people’s lives in the name of protecting borders and security. By most accounts, the Turkish and Iranian attacks have occurred before the eyes of international human rights institutions, the international community and the United Nations.&nbsp;</p> <p>CPT Iraqi Kurdistan, for the second time, visited some of the villagers of Zewke after Turkish bombing had displaced them. In 21 November 2019, Kak Hamad Ameen, Zewka’s village leader, welcomed us at his house in Qaladze where his family and 14 other families are currently residing since they left their village.</p> <p>After drinking some tea with Kak Hamad Ameen’s family, we asked him about their situation and living conditions. He smiled and said, “ ‘What is it like to be displaced?!’ As a refugee from another part of Kurdistan, in my heart I say... bitter.”&nbsp;</p> <p>Kak Hamad Ameen took another sip from his tea and said, “We had hoped the government and organizations like yours would come to our aid while we were in the tents, but the cold arrived before you, and therefore each one of us was forced to move to somewhere else. As you see, my family and some other families are currently based in Qaladze and the rest of the villagers are distributed among other villages.”</p> <p>He talked about the difficulties of life in the city, and said, “Everything costs us twice as much. In the village, each of us stayed in our home, we did not pay any rent and we used wood to heat our houses. Also, our children wore their own simple clothes to school, and they did not need a dress code. Currently, the children are separated from their school friends and every student continues to study in another school.”</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="525" src="/sites/default/files/vunhkml-2_0.jpg" width="700" /></p> <h6>After the Turkish airplanes bombed Zewka, villagers became displaced and lived in tents for more than one month.</h6> <p>After the Turkish airplanes bombed Zewka, villagers became displaced and lived in tents for more than one month.</p> <p>Mam Abdulla, the eldest person of his village, turned to us and said, “We should ignore all these problems; a homeland is beloved; thus we neither want our villages to remain abandoned nor do we want to give up our villages.”</p> <p>Pur Ayesh, mother of Kak Hamad Ameen, stayed silent throughout our conversation. When we told her that we titled our recent report, "Bombing or Flooding," after something she had told us, she gave us a sweet smile, which made me more curious to hear the story of their displacement and the bombardments from her perspective as a woman.</p> <p>In the end, Kaka Hamad Ameen said, “The story of Zewka and hundreds of other villages in Qandil deserve to be heard because they all suffer the same consequences. Since the uprising, we have been forced to leave our village four times, and among all the neighboring countries, only Syria has not bombarded us.” With a bitter smile, he continued, “However Iran, Turkey and Iraq during Ba'ath regime have not deprived us of that.”</p> <p>When we left Kak Hamad Ameen’s house, we traveled through an area that has been bombed in the past to hear more stories from the victims of this unjust violence—violence that shows itself through bombardments, shellings, and sometimes through the military operations of neighboring countries. While I was gazing at the last burst of Qandil’s sun, I was thinking about all the heard and unheard stories that are still in the hearts of the people who are living on the borders.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1408" hreflang="en">Kurdistan</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1406" hreflang="en">Iraq</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 17 Apr 2020 17:32:47 +0000 Kathy Kern 12353 at https://cpt.org CPT INTERNATIONAL: COVID-19 and the Bubble of I https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/04/08/cpt-international-covid-19-and-bubble-i <span>CPT INTERNATIONAL: COVID-19 and the Bubble of I</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Wed, 04/08/2020 - 13:03</span> <div><p>8 April 2020</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="719" src="/sites/default/files/EUgWSyWWsAEPcZG.jpg" width="729" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>by Mona el-Zuhairi</p> <p>Around March 2020 mainstream channels, starting in China, began to publicize the outbreak of COVID-19.&nbsp; The news then spread out like wildfire.</p> <p>Why was there a delay announcing it? Why was there a delay taking safety measures worldwide?</p> <p>Individually we remained ignorant while the outbreak wasn’t close to our loved ones, or us and we only started to think about it when we learned about social isolation in other places.</p> <p>Then, social isolation became the primary safety measure for everyone.</p> <p>According to Maslow, security is the second need for humans after physiological needs, followed by the need for love and belonging.</p> <p>COVID-19 didn’t stop the human need for love and belonging, but it changed the framework of how it looks and is manifested.</p> <p>COVID 19 placed the ongoing debate between individuality and the collective on center stage.</p> <p>Again the need for social distancing became a need to achieve safety; the instinct of self-preservation became the leading player in this disaster.</p> <p>In the beginning, the individual didn’t take the pandemic seriously because the “I” was safe. It wasn’t until there were institutional and government calls for action that people started to conform. In my opinion, they conformed out of fear generally, and fear of stigmatization.</p> <p>Then the requirement to distance changed from friendly calls and social pressure to lockdowns and orders. That’s when collective obedience started and individuals started to leave their fake bubble of consumerism, to push the button of being safe.</p> <p>The human connection didn’t stop, but organically, communities started to go back to their natural state, which is solidarity and collective safety, opposing the individuality that capitalism created.</p> <p>Capitalism through history was feeding individual greed through its pillars:</p> <ul> <li>wage labour (working for a wage),</li> <li>private ownership of the means of production (things like factories, machinery, farms, and offices),</li> <li>output for exchange and profit&nbsp;<a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s0aKIS2RV7J3XouZ9me8v2VENLhntHrL/edit#heading=h.30j0zll">[i]</a></li> </ul> <p>It is clear, within these principles, that if you possess the resources you will probably continue to achieve more, but if you are part of the working class, the only worry you have is how you will make it through the end of the month because with no production YOU are DONE.</p> <p>In the era of capitalism, humanity has lost a lot through greed and selfishness, where the mantra has become “me and no one but me”.</p> <p>Many studies have shown that capitalism changed the values of communities where “the main result reveals that with the evolution from rural to capitalistic societies, people are likely to be less prosocial and more likely to be competitive”<a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s0aKIS2RV7J3XouZ9me8v2VENLhntHrL/edit#heading=h.1fob9te">[ii]</a></p> <p>People hoarding and buying as much as they can in response to this crisis has proven how consumption has become part of our social fabric; it is what Hollywood movies have illustrated time and time again in their disaster movie industry.</p> <p>Capitalism and imperialism didn’t start yesterday, and&nbsp; from the beginning, they have been built on human suffering; the smallpox epidemic between the15th and 17th centuries was a turning point for the formation of capitalism as one historian has suggested<a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s0aKIS2RV7J3XouZ9me8v2VENLhntHrL/edit#heading=h.3znysh7">[iii]</a></p> <p>COVID-19 is showing the world how global solidarity is a MUST; going back to our human core values around equality and equity is our responsibility.</p> <p>COVID-19 shows us all that a small virus dissolves privilege.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s0aKIS2RV7J3XouZ9me8v2VENLhntHrL/edit#heading=h.2et92p0">[i]</a>&nbsp;Li, Kui. (2017). Capitalism and Socialism</p> <p><a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s0aKIS2RV7J3XouZ9me8v2VENLhntHrL/edit#heading=h.tyjcwt">[ii]</a>Shibly Shahrier, Koji Kotani, Social Value Orientation and Capitalism in Societies</p> <p><a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s0aKIS2RV7J3XouZ9me8v2VENLhntHrL/edit#heading=h.3dy6vkm">[iii]</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/author/debanjali-bose">Debanjali Bose</a>, 2020, 11 ways pandemics have changed the course of human history, from the over $4 billion spent to fight Ebola to the trillions it might take to tackle the coronavirus.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1400" hreflang="en">CPT International</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1425" hreflang="en">Reflections</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 08 Apr 2020 18:03:21 +0000 Kathy Kern 12349 at https://cpt.org CPT INTERNATIONAL: Newsletter January - March, 2020 | Transforming Oppressions https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/04/06/cpt-international-newsletter-january-march-2020-tranforming-oppressions <span>CPT INTERNATIONAL: Newsletter January - March, 2020 | Transforming Oppressions</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Mon, 04/06/2020 - 06:22</span> <div><div style="padding-top:10px; padding-right:10px; padding-bottom:10px; padding-left:10px"> <div> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="/sites/default/files/2020-04/SOTT-JAN-MAR-2020_online.pdf"><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="524" src="/sites/default/files/2020-04/SOTT-JAN-MAR-2020_cover%20copy.jpg" width="300" /></a></p> <h3><a href="/sites/default/files/2020-04/SOTT-JAN-MAR-2020_online.pdf">Read the Newsletter</a></h3> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">Dear CPT Community,</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">Our teams in <a href="https://lists.cpt.org/sites/all/modules/civicrm/extern/url.php?u=12164&amp;qid=" rel="nofollow" style="text-decoration:none; color:#ab1e2c" target="_blank">Palestine, Colombia, Iraqi Kurdistan, Lesvos, Turtle Island and at the US/Mexico Borderlands</a> have either closed down temporarily, or have shifted to the digital-only realm. Till it is deemed safe to return to the routine of daily life, teams will be unable to respond to the needs of our partners in the usual way. How will the COVID-19 pandemic affect our partners? Just because the world is entering ‘Social distancing,’ does the violence stop? These are questions that only time can answer. But what we know for sure, is that the spear of oppression will only dig in deeper. For small farmers in Colombia who have always been abandoned by the state, what can they expect?</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">What this virus has been able to do, is what the work of undoing oppressions attempts to do: pull back the curtain, and reveal to the world the structures of violence, hatred and oppression, directed at the most vulnerable among us. Maybe today, we will see what living in Gaza is like - 14 years of quarantine, a.k.a. “Open Air Prison.” Maybe it’ll take us as long as COVID-19 is around to understand. Or maybe sooner.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">What does naming, challenging and transforming the violence and oppression that our partners are subject to look like? In this issue, we invite you into conversations – often had on teams – about the daily work of transforming oppression. We would also love to hear back from you on how you are challenging these structures that dehumanize us all.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">The virus’ revelation of the vulnerabilities of the system may be a gift to us - an evolutionary jump so to speak. Maybe we’ll jump to that point in history where together we’ll have to build a system that is fair and just, because the old system worked for only a few.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">The World Has Changed:<br /> Wake up &amp; smell<br /> The possibility.<br /> The world<br /> Has changed:<br /> It did not<br /> Change<br /> Without<br /> Your prayers<br /> Without<br /> Your faith<br /> Without<br /> Your determination<br /> To<br /> Believe<br /> In liberation<br /> &amp;<br /> Kindness;<br /> Without<br /> Your<br /> Dancing<br /> Through the years<br /> That<br /> Had<br /> No<br /> Beat.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">An excerpt from<em> The World Has Changed</em> <strong>by Alice Walker.</strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="font-size:14px"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="color:#555555"><span style="font-family:Arial, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, sans-serif"><span style="line-height:1.5"><span style="word-break:break-word">In Kindness,<br /> Caldwell Manners</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> </div> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1400" hreflang="en">CPT International</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 06 Apr 2020 11:22:14 +0000 Caldwell 12348 at https://cpt.org ANNOUNCEMENT: Solidarity During Coronavirus https://cpt.org/cptnet/2020/03/27/announcement-solidarity-during-coronavirus <span>ANNOUNCEMENT: Solidarity During Coronavirus</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caldwell</span></span> <span>Fri, 03/27/2020 - 07:39</span> <div><p>Dear CPT Community,</p> <p>Over the last few weeks, our teams and partners in Palestine, Colombia, Iraqi Kurdistan, Turtle Island, Lesvos and the U.S./Mexico Borderlands have all felt the devastating effect of the rapidly spreading COVID-19 virus. Governments in each of these countries have imposed quarantine, self-isolation, and curfew orders to mitigate the spread, which has severely impacted our ability to continue the work of accompaniment.</p> <p>We recognize the vulnerability of our partners in a time like this. Historically, not only have they suffered from governments that disregard them or even wish they were gone, but now, the little assistance they have is being reallocated away to major cities. This shift could potentially place our partners in greater harm, not only from Coronavirus, but also from those bombing, displacing, and killing them. For the migrants and refugees we accompany in the Aegean Islands and the U.S./Mexico border, seeking refuge has become more uncertain than ever, leaving them highly vulnerable to the violence they are fleeing.</p> <p>To protect our partners and ourselves, we have suspended regular accompaniment in all programs, and have adapted to online strategies of advocacy and accompaniment in response to our partners’ needs. We are in constant communication with them and are closely monitoring the situation on the ground. In addition, we have cancelled our delegations in April and May.</p> <p>While the virus pulls back the curtain on systemic injustice, it also presents each and every one of us with a decision on how we respond to our needs and the needs of those around us. Our work is deeply grounded in challenging systems of oppression that suppress the flourishing of all life. We reject the notion that life on the periphery of society is worth sacrificing to preserve the economy. Rather, the gift of those considered “unproductive” or “less” by the system: migrant workers, refugees, subsistence farmers, sex workers, domestic help, the homeless, disabled persons, the elderly, or the poor— among others— is what makes the human family so much richer.&nbsp; We celebrate this diversity.</p> <p>As well as revealing an oppressive global economic system, the virus reminds us of solidarity and community. Your commitment to the work of ‘building partnerships to transform violence and oppression,’ has sustained us for 34 years. You were there during the hostage crisis of 2005 and in 2008 during the global financial meltdown. You believed in the work of active nonviolent peacebuilding. We are thankful for a community we can continue to rely on as we and our partners take health precautions. It is critical that we continue supporting the courageous grassroots peacemaking of our partners who defend health and security for all. We greatly appreciate your continued <a href="https://lists.cpt.org/sites/all/modules/civicrm/extern/url.php?u=12147&amp;qid=" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">financial support</a> and solidarity.</p> <p>In the coming weeks, we will update you with opportunities to learn about our partners and our work, and ways in which you can, from home, support the work of peacebuilding and resistance to systems that consider human beings disposable.</p> <p>Stay safe and take good care of each other,</p> <p>CPT Family</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1400" hreflang="en">CPT International</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 27 Mar 2020 12:39:00 +0000 Caldwell 12346 at https://cpt.org