Christian Peacemaker Teams - Turn your Faith into Action for Peace https://cpt.org/rss.xml en Niagara community affirms Indigenous sovereignty as Trudeau speaks at Brock University https://cpt.org/cptnet/2019/01/18/niagara-community-affirms-indigenous-sovereignty-trudeau-speaks-brock-university <span> Niagara community affirms Indigenous sovereignty as Trudeau speaks at Brock University</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Fri, 01/18/2019 - 12:55</span> <div><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><img alt="Brock University release_0.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/Brock%20University%20release_0.jpg" width="800" /></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:&quot;Liberation Serif&quot;, serif"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none">As part of a series of public actions opposed to the Canadian invasion of sovereign Indigenous nations and in solidarity with the Wet’suwet’en Nation, Niagara regional community members, including members of Christian Peacemaker Teams, and the Six Nations Men’s Fire blocked an entrance to Brock University where the Prime Minister was speaking. The recent RCMP raids against the Unist’ot’en Camp, enforcing a court injunction to clear the way for construction of the Coastal Gaslink pipeline, have drawn outrage and condemnation across Turtle Island.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:&quot;Liberation Serif&quot;, serif"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none">From 3:00 p.m. onwards, a coalition of local Indigenous people and their allies, anchored by the Men’s Fire of the nearby Six Nations Reserve, assembled and lit a fire on the entrance road, redirecting traffic of those seeking to participate in the Prime Minister’s event. Those protesting included students and faculty of Brock, workers, unions and parents, many of whom brought their own signs expressing their opposition to the Federal government’s support for pipelines without the consent of the traditional governments of affected Indigenous nations.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:&quot;Liberation Serif&quot;, serif"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none">Members of Christian Peacemaker Teams participated in today’s action in ongoing support of the rights of all Indigenous Peoples to exist on their ancestral lands and to refuse projects that imperil their lands and waters. In response to the action, CPTer Rachelle Friesen said, “The Prime Minister was elected on a platform of reconciliation. His party voted in support of Bill C262, yet the government’s words are in direct opposition to their actions. The invasion of Unist’ot’en Camp is being described as an act of war and is a clear message that the violence of settler colonialism continues to be modus operandi of the Canadian government.”&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:&quot;Liberation Serif&quot;, serif"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none">In the days since the RCMP tore down the Gidumt’en checkpoint and arrested over a dozen community members in violation of Indigenous sovereignty, the Prime Minister has given a series of ‘town hall’ question-and-answer sessions in Canadian cities. Canada is a signatory to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which clearly states that Indigenous Peoples shall not be forcibly removed from their lands (Article 10). When challenged on this breach of human rights, in light of his government’s supposed agenda of reconciliation, the Prime Minister has failed to offer an explanation.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:&quot;Liberation Serif&quot;, serif"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none">The principles of&nbsp;<span lang="ZH-CN" style="font-family:SimSun">“</span>free, prior and informed consent<span lang="ZH-CN" style="font-family:SimSun">”</span>(FPIC) are the foundation for a respectful relationship between Canada and Indigenous Nations, but Canadian history is full of such egregious violations of these relationships in favour of the extraction economy. The protest featured the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/christibelcourt/media_set?set=a.10156653085845272&amp;type=3"><span class="InternetLink" style="color:navy"><span style="text-decoration:underline">powerful images created by Métis artist Christi Belcourt</span></span></a>and shared for the use of Water Protectors, making the connection between clean water, the health of future generations, and the right to refuse consent and to have this refusal respected.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1404" hreflang="en">Indigenous Peoples Solidarity</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1397" hreflang="en">Canada</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 18 Jan 2019 18:55:46 +0000 Kathy Kern 12172 at https://cpt.org CPT Palestine: URGENT call for reservists and interns https://cpt.org/cptnet/2019/01/10/cpt-palestine-urgent-call-reservists-and-interns <span>CPT Palestine: URGENT call for reservists and interns</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caitlin</span></span> <span>Thu, 01/10/2019 - 14:37</span> <div><p>CPT Palestine is in urgent need of people to serve on team ASAP. If you haven't yet trained with CPT but would like to get involved, this may be your chance to join the team as an intern!</p> <p><img alt="Palestine URGENT Call January 2019.png" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="1056" src="/sites/default/files/Palestine%20URGENT%20Call%20January%202019.png" width="816" /></p> </div> Thu, 10 Jan 2019 20:37:28 +0000 Caitlin 12170 at https://cpt.org Welcoming Muriel Schmid: An Interview with CPT's Directors https://cpt.org/cptnet/2018/11/30/welcoming-muriel-schmid-interview-cpts-directors <span>Welcoming Muriel Schmid: An Interview with CPT&#039;s Directors</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caitlin</span></span> <span>Tue, 01/01/2019 - 14:12</span> <div><p><em>In January, 2019, CPT is excited to welcome a new Administrative Director, Muriel Schmid. In a revival of CPT’s past co-director model, Muriel will work with Milena Rincón, who has worked as Program Director for over two years and has helped guide the organization through several shifts in its organizational structure. Our Communications Coordinator sat down with both Muriel and Milena to ask them to share their thoughts, hopes and plans for their new co-directorship.</em></p> <h6 class="text-align-center"><img alt="muriel-training.JPG" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="2448" src="/sites/default/files/muriel-training.JPG" width="3264" /><br /> <em>Muriel with the rest of her CPT training group in 2013.</em></h6> <p><strong>Q: To start out with, I was hoping that each of you could tell me a little bit about yourself, and about what you bring to your roles as Administrative and Program Director.</strong></p> <p><strong>MILENA: </strong>I am from Colombia, and I do my CPT work from Colombia. I have worked with CPT for almost 16 years. I grew up as first as a Roman Catholic, now I identify as Mennonite. I studied Psychology with a focus on Clinical Psychology as a part of my Bachelor, and I have a Masters in International Relations from a Swiss university, and a Masters in Political Science from a Colombian university. I am a very committed person to social justice issues; being a Colombian, a descendant of people who were forced into displacement, and witnessing the impact of violence in my country, &nbsp;makes me very aware and very sensitive to issues of war, conflict, and the need for sustainable peace in Colombia . CPT offers an opportunity for me to do the work of peacebuilding and peacemaking, from a different perspective. Working with CPT, for 16 years, has helped me to be who I am.&nbsp;</p> <p>What I bring: perspective, commitment, and honesty for this work. Being from south America, and having served in many contexts and cultures where conflict is present, but also different approaches to peacemaking in our partner communities.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MURIEL:</strong> I am a theologian and a minister who grew up in the French-speaking part of Switzerland. My ties are still pretty strong with Switzerland. I came to the US for an extended period of time for the first time in 1995 when I was 30, and that really kind of changed the course of my life in many ways; I met my partner, who is my spouse now, so that’s definitely changed a lot of my life. My first encounter with Christians who were more oriented towards social justice and engagement was with the Quakers. It actually answered some kind of longing I had to find Christians who were living their faith in a very concrete way, in engagement, in social justice issues. That pushed me in different directions but led me to CPT many years later. I got acquainted with CPT’s work when I was in Palestine with EAPPI, and I did my delegation and then my training with CPT. Then I worked as Program Director for two years from 2014-2016.</p> <p>What I can bring to CPT: doubt, questions. And I’ve been working in different environments … I worked in administration at a university in the US, I taught, I did some training in mediation and work for the Court’s mediation program in Utah, I worked as a minister for 10 years. So [I &nbsp;definitely bring] organizational skills. And people skills; I like to engage with people, I like to listen to stories.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Q: For the next question, I thought that we could focus more on the co-leadership model. How would you describe how your roles fit into the structure of CPT?</strong></p> <p><strong>MILENA: </strong>This is not a new model; we had a co-director model several years ago. One of the reasons we returned to this model was because the collaboration between the two directors seems very key and very important for the development of the organization. Each director brought specific skills that will help to complement each other with the purpose of helping the organization to grow.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>MURIEL: </strong>I would emphasize that CPT is going back to a model that has existed at some point and seemed to be working to some extent at least, and the idea of going back to that to me translates some kind of trust in the model. I think I said that in the interview process, but the fact that Milena was the other director mattered for several reasons. First, I know Milena; I know her work and I know she has a long history with CPT. But also she’s a person of color, she lives in another place, she has another context, another environment and perspective, and I think that matters for CPT especially. So that’s unique, the fact that we are two women and we are not both white, or the fact that neither one of us is from Turtle Island, and I hope it will bring different things or a different way to think about it. When Milena was talking I had this image of Janus, the two-faced god in traditional Roman mythology. I think it really matters that you have two pairs of eyes looking at things, and [you are] able to share about what you look at, not looking in the same direction in the same way.</p> <p><strong>MILENA: </strong>It could be a very powerful model for CPT to have, in this case, two females in the leadership, and two females from -- actually that’s right Muriel, neither of us is originally from the US context. We will bring an outsider perspective view. So that will be very interesting.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Q: So we are returning to a model that we have faith in from the past of CPT, but one thing that is very new about it is the individuals involved, and the dynamic of the two of you together. Have you worked together before, and how do the two of you anticipate working together as a team?</strong></p> <p><strong>MURIEL: </strong>The formal way we worked together was when I was Program Director and Milena was a Program Support Coordinator for -- I don’t know how many projects [laughs] but I think it was Iraqi Kurdistan and Colombia at the time, right? That was the formal way we worked together, and then in that capacity we did work on two trainings together as part of the training team. And then I followed closely her work for her Masters thesis in Switzerland, and I have been a little bit supporting Milena in her role as Program Director, as I felt that could be one of my tasks as reservist also.&nbsp;</p> <p>In terms of the formal work that we did together, I would go back to Undoing Oppressions and I would say we complement each other pretty well in the type of oppressions we pay attention to. I also appreciate [that] usually I think [Milena] says what she thinks, which is helpful when you work closely with someone. So I don’t feel like we would spiral into, like, a terrible conflict together. [laughs] But you know, anything can happen, but I don’t anticipate having conflict with Milena. Disagreement, probably, things we need to explain, yes, but we would not block the organization because we have a personal conflict.&nbsp;</p> <p>And then as I said also beforehand, I think Milena has a history with the organization and a perspective and a vision that is pretty unique. Not many people have worked for so long in the organization, and in different capacities in the organization, which I think really matters. I really rely on Milena for voicing concerns that are rooted in some experience and perspective that I don’t have.</p> <p><strong>MILENA: </strong>We both served on EAPPI too, so we got experience from another organization on how accompaniment can be done or not to be done.&nbsp;</p> <p>Something that I really liked, especially when I was PSC for projects, was the organized thinking Muriel has. I really like in our conversations that Muriel asked really good questions, and that may reaffirm what you mentioned, Muriel, that you bring questions. You always bring really good questions to help me to think about other ways to imagine the work we are doing.</p> <p>Also a very calm presence. Maybe my feelings and my emotions are more evident at all times. Muriel has a very calm steady presence. For me it is very important in the work, kind of grounds me too. And this is something that I found a lot working with [Interim Administrative Director] Jonathan too. And it is about the experience you have and he has had, Muriel, in leadership positions, coming from organizations outside of CPT. All the leadership skills I have learned have been within CPT, so working with somebody who has outside experience is really good for me.&nbsp;</p> <p>And I also want to highlight the conversations about Undoing Oppressions and especially all the growth I need to do, and I feel Muriel has advanced a lot in that growth as a theologian, in relation with Christian hegemony. So a lot of conversations have been around how CPT culture can grow on understanding better Christian hegemony, so that all of us can feel we are in a safe environment in terms of spirituality too.</p> <p><strong>Q: CPT is very much in a process of change. If you could think of one or two sentences that would describe one thing that you’re really hoping CPT can achieve in the next two or three years, what comes to mind?</strong></p> <p><strong>MILENA:</strong> Maybe this is my bias as a Program-focused person, but the way we do accompaniment. It seems that the times are also asking us to reimagine the way we do accompaniment. I perceive CPT as a very advanced organization in that sense, that other organizations look to for a model, so that’s good, but also times maybe are telling us that we need to imagine our accompaniment work to what is most needed now.</p> <p><strong>MURIEL: </strong>Building on what Milena said about rethinking accompaniment and how we do accompaniment, I would say that for me there is something about CPT’s identity that maybe needs to be reassembled. What is the face you present to the outside and how do you formulate, what is it that we do, really,? And then I would say, export our skills. As Milena [has] said, we serve as a model for other programs, can we expand that? The training has very high rating in many circles? And I think the work around Undoing Oppressions, it’s pretty unique, can we export that as well? Bring our strength outside of CPT.</p> <p><strong>MILENA: </strong>Yeah, I will agree with Muriel about the need for CPT to get clarity about what CPT is. We mentioned that we are accompaniers, that we accompany, and maybe the times are telling us that it is time for us to rethink, or maybe to innovate on what we want to do. What Muriel mentioned for example about skills and training to other organizations could be an area of growth for us, how we can share those skills. And I also imagine, especially from the program area, we have dreamed about increasing our potential for communications and for advocacy. And I say this because partners believe that we do a lot of advocacy and communication, and I don’t know if we are really corresponding to the expectations we are creating with the partners about those two areas. I hope we can finally do it. For that we need stability. So I hope [laughs] we both, Muriel, as directors can create this sense of stability for the organization.</p> <p>Of course my vision is very narrow to programs and I was talking about partners, but CPT is so many people! Also we have a lot of people outside supporting us. And I get the sense that they like to be a part of CPT, and they want to be considered part of CPT, and so my question is how we can effectively can make them feel that they are actually part of the organization in the capacity they want.</p> <p><em>This interview highlights some of CPT's greatest hopes for the coming years: a revival of the co-directorship model with an eye to both stability and growth. Muriel and Milena will begin their directorial partnership with a history of collaboration and mutual respect, with a set of complementary experiences and skills, and with a shared commitment to the future of the organization. We look forward to seeing what new developments their leadership will bring.</em></p> </div> Tue, 01 Jan 2019 20:12:43 +0000 Caitlin 12150 at https://cpt.org Post-Advent Reflection: CHRIST LIGHT in al-Khalil https://cpt.org/cptnet/2018/12/30/post-advent-reflection-christ-light-al-khalil <span>Post-Advent Reflection: CHRIST LIGHT in al-Khalil</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caitlin</span></span> <span>Sun, 12/30/2018 - 11:58</span> <div><p><em>Christian Peacemaker Teams wish to celebrate this Advent season by offering reflections on the symbols of each Advent candle. Week to week, each of our teams will share a story in honor of the season.</em></p> <p><em>For our final, Post-Advent reflection, we offer this story on the theme of the Christ Light.</em></p> <p data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="christlight.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="480" src="/sites/default/files/christlight.jpg" width="852" /><span title="Click and drag to resize">​</span></span></p> <h3 class="text-align-center">Christ Light in al-Khalil</h3> <p class="text-align-center">by Lisa Pires<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <em>The Light shines in the darkness, a light that darkness cannot quench</em><br /> - John 1:5<br /> <em>He brings them out of darkness into light&nbsp;</em><br /> - Quran 2:257</p> <p>Christmas comes just after the winter solstice, the darkest day of the year. Into this darkness the Christ Light comes, symbolizing the hopes of all humankind for peace, love and justice. The Christ Light is universal and inclusive, embracing all races, religions, nations and peoples: in fact, the entire Universe. It shines even when it is not perceptible to our finite senses, in the midst of horror, injustice, inequality, and all that is in the darkness.</p> <p>In al-Khalil (Hebron), we CPTers experience this Christ Light in the warm smiles of the people we meet each day, even when they suffer humiliation and oppression.</p> <p>We experience this Light in each child who goes through the checkpoint every morning, despite the constant fear of meeting the use of force and arrest on their way to school.</p> <p>This Light shines in the faces of the shopkeepers in the marketplace as they perseveringly open their shops, knowing that they may not make even a shekel that day.</p> <p>The organizations we walk with to transform oppression and violence shine with the Light of determination, courage and perseverance.</p> <p>While at times we feel that the situation is hopeless, we carry on because the Light is still burning in our hearts.&nbsp;</p> <p>“They tried to bury us, they did not know we are seeds."*<br /> This hope is our Christ Light.</p> <p><em>* Originally adapted from a poem by Greek poet Dinos Christianopoulos, this message has been transformed into a rallying cry among many activists.</em></p> <p>---</p> <p><em>Lisa Pires is from India. She is a member of the Presentation Sisters, a Catholic religious order. She was a full time member of CPT in Hebron, and while intending to serve for a minimum of three years, was denied entry into the country this September.</em></p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1415" hreflang="en">Palestine</a></div> </div> </div> Sun, 30 Dec 2018 17:58:49 +0000 Caitlin 12167 at https://cpt.org Fourth Sunday in Advent: LOVE is unity https://cpt.org/cptnet/2018/12/22/fourth-sunday-advent-love-unity <span>Fourth Sunday in Advent: LOVE is unity</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Sat, 12/22/2018 - 16:24</span> <div><p>by&nbsp;Runbir Serkepkani</p> <p><img alt="moriasolidarity_1.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="548" src="/sites/default/files/moriasolidarity_1.jpg" width="600" /><br /> <em>CPTers participate in a nonviolent demonstration in solidarity with incarcerated migrants.</em></p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top" width="564"> <p><b>Advent Reflections 2018</b></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><i>Christian Peacemaker Teams wish to celebrate this Advent season by offering reflections on the symbols of each&nbsp;</i></p> <p><i>Advent candle. Week to week, each of our teams will share a story in honor of the season.</i></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><i>This Sunday, we consider the theme of Love.</i></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Love is unity.<br /> <br /> Love is Pikpa, where a safe space is provided to people who need to recover from the violence of borders, where they can rest, and give themselves the time it takes for a broken heart to heal and dance again.<br /> <br /> Love is the courageous lawyers of Legal Centre Lesvos and HIAS, who work night and day to aid migrants with their asylum cases, while the nation states of Europe intentionally and systematically break their own laws and conventions to criminalize migration.<br /> <br /> Love is No Border Kitchen, giving food to people who have been abandoned by everyone else.<br /> <br /> Love is when activists at Deportation Monitoring Aegean work tirelessly, navigating through a system that lacks transparency and denies fundamental rights to migrants, in order to prevent deportations.<br /> <br /> Love is the disobedient door that opens for the stranger in a world where more walls are built than trees are planted. Love is the oasis where tired feet and the persecuted children of Mother Earth can rest. Love is when locals, migrants, those who stand in solidarity, and human rights workers come together to resist borders and the oppression that is being imposed by the State and the EU.</p> <p><em>Runbir Serkepkani, born 1984 in the village of Serkepkan, northern part of Zagros Mountains. Runbir lives on Lesvos Island in the Northern Aegean. He loves poetry, walking, having nice conversations and fighting injustice and capitalism.</em></p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1402" hreflang="en">Europe</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1423" hreflang="en">Lectionary</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1413" hreflang="en">Migration</a></div> </div> </div> Sat, 22 Dec 2018 22:24:28 +0000 Kathy Kern 12165 at https://cpt.org CPT Steering Committee Introduces Muriel Schmid, NEW ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR with PROGRAM DIRECTOR, Milena Rincón in two-director leadership model https://cpt.org/cptnet/2018/12/21/cpt-steering-committee-introduces-muriel-schmid-new-administrative-director <span>CPT Steering Committee Introduces Muriel Schmid, NEW ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR with PROGRAM DIRECTOR, Milena Rincón in two-director leadership model</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/4" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Caitlin</span></span> <span>Fri, 12/21/2018 - 11:43</span> <div><h6><img alt="muriel-and-milena.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="434" src="/sites/default/files/muriel-and-milena.jpg" width="565" /><br /> <em>Left: Muriel Schmid, our new Administrative Director; Right: Milena Rincón, continuing in her role as Program Director.</em></h6> <p>CPT is pleased to announce the appointment of Muriel Schmid (Louisville, Kentucky, USA) as our new Administrative Director. &nbsp;Beginning January 2, 2019, Muriel joins Program Director, Milena Rincón (Madrid, Colombia) in a two-director leadership model to guide CPT.</p> <p>Muriel is an ordained minister who served the Swiss Reformed Church for ten years. &nbsp;Born in Geneva, Switzerland and raised in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, she left her home country in 1995 to study at Princeton Theological Seminary. &nbsp;It was there that she met her life partner and spouse, Christine Jones. &nbsp;She then pursued an academic career and worked for ten years at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City where she founded and directed their religious studies program. Muriel first met CPT in 2010 and joined in 2013. &nbsp;Her encounter with CPT inspired her to leave academia and pursue her vocation in conflict resolution and peacemaking work.</p> <p>Milena has served with CPT for 16 years, the past two as Program Director. &nbsp;Born and raised in Colombia, she is a member of the Mennonite Church in her hometown of Madrid and does her CPT work from there. &nbsp;She studied Psychology with a focus on Clinical Psychology as an undergrad, and earned a Masters in International Relations from a Swiss university, and a Masters in Political Science from a Colombian university. &nbsp;As a descendant of people who were forcibly displaced, and having witnessed the impact of violence in her own country, Milena is very aware of and sensitive to issues of war, conflict, and the need for sustainable peace.&nbsp;</p> <p>“We are very excited to welcome Muriel as CPT’s Administrative Director,” said Nathan Hosler, CPT Steering Committee Chair and Director of the Church of the Brethren’s Office of Peacebuilding and Policy. &nbsp;“Muriel’s history with the organization combined with her outstanding administrative leadership will provide the dynamic compliment to Milena’s deeply-rooted, highly-skilled leadership of our program area that CPT needs to move us forward in our work of building partnerships to transform violence and oppression.” &nbsp;</p> <p>“CPT would also like to take this opportunity to offer our heartfelt thanks for the service of outgoing Interim Administrative Director, Jonathan Shively,” added Nathan. &nbsp;“Jonathan’s particular leadership skills helped position CPT to move to this next step with healthy vigor.”<br /> &nbsp;</p> </div> Fri, 21 Dec 2018 17:43:15 +0000 Caitlin 12164 at https://cpt.org Indigenous Peoples Solidarity: Justice for Grassy Narrows https://cpt.org/cptnet/2018/12/20/indigenous-peoples-solidarity-justice-grassy-narrows <span>Indigenous Peoples Solidarity: Justice for Grassy Narrows</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/20/2018 - 12:55</span> <div><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p>by Sr. Rosemary Williamson, OLM</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In the 1960’s the Dryden pulp and paper mill dumped ten tons of mercury into the Wabigoon River system upstream from Grassy Narrows.&nbsp; This contaminated the walleye fish that the people ate, resulting in slurred speech, tremors, impaired hearing, tunnel vision and lost muscle coordination— all signs of Minamata disease.&nbsp; It also destroyed their fishing tourism industry.</p> <p>In the 1980s the government set up a Mercury Disability Board to compensate those affected but it proved ineffective with 70% of the applicants turned down for compensation.&nbsp; Officials for years said the mercury would fade away.&nbsp; This claim has been proven to be false.&nbsp; Scientists strongly suspect that old mercury still contaminates the mill site and continues to pollute the river.&nbsp; The adults continue to exhibit record high levels of mercury in hair, blood and umbilical cord blood.</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><img alt="?????????????" data-attachment-id="1413" data-comments-opened="1" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" data-image-description="" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;2.2&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;SM-J320W8&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;?????????????&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1544099174&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;3.3&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;50&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.00097751710654936&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;1&quot;}" data-image-title="youth" data-large-file="https://ourladysmissionariescom.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/youth.jpg?w=448" data-medium-file="https://ourladysmissionariescom.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/youth.jpg?w=300" data-orig-file="https://ourladysmissionariescom.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/youth.jpg" data-orig-size="448,336" data-original-height="337" data-original-width="449" height="337" itemprop="http://schema.org/image" src="https://ourladysmissionariescom.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/youth.jpg?w=449&amp;h=337" title="youth" width="449" /></p> <p>The most recent study clearly indicates the on-going impacts of mercury poisoning and an article from the December 5&nbsp;<i>Toronto Star</i>notes, “Children age 4 to 11 have a higher reported rate of ear infections, speech problems, and learning disabilities compared to that of other First Nations children.” “Grassy teens are struggling in school, with shorter attention spans than other First Nations teens the research found.” Last year the provincial government did commit to $85 million clean up of the river and the federal government has pledged to help build a mercury care home that will help but neither project has yet begun. Will the people of Grassy Narrows receive Justice after all these years?</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" itemprop="image" src="https://ourladysmissionariescom.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/fighting-for-rights.jpg?w=656&amp;h=492" /></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">The day after the release of this report, a rally was held in Ottawa at the foot of Parliament Hill.&nbsp; Indigenous peoples from across Canada attended to support the efforts of Grassy Narrows along with settlers.</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">Canada has signed two relevant United Nations documents:</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">1.”The United Nations &nbsp;Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.”</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p>2. “Minamata Convention on Mercury” which is a United Nations Environmental Document.</p> <p>Both of these documents are legally binding.</p> <p>Judy da Silva, a long-term activist for Grassy said, , “We are proud of our kids…They amaze me every day with their humour, their pride, and their strength. They should not have to fight again and again for basic justice that others in Canada take for granted.</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1404" hreflang="en">Indigenous Peoples Solidarity</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 20 Dec 2018 18:55:38 +0000 Kathy Kern 12163 at https://cpt.org Prayers for Peacemakers, 19 December 2018 https://cpt.org/cptnet/2018/12/19/prayers-peacemakers-19-december-2018-0 <span>Prayers for Peacemakers, 19 December 2018</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Wed, 12/19/2018 - 13:11</span> <div><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><img alt="PFP Collage_1.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/PFP%20Collage_1.jpg" width="600" /></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none">Pray for the light of liberating love to infuse CPTers in the field, their partners, CPT support staff and the Christian Peacemaker Team constituency this season as they struggle with systemic oppression, violence, financial difficulties and loss.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><br /> <span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><em>In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.&nbsp; He was in the beginning with God.&nbsp; All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being&nbsp;in him was life,&nbsp;and the life was the light of all people.&nbsp; </em></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <blockquote> <h2 class="text-align-center" style="margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 15px;">John 1:1-5</span></h2> </blockquote> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1408" hreflang="en">Kurdistan</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1396" hreflang="en">Borderlands</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1399" hreflang="en">Colombia</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1415" hreflang="en">Palestine</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1416" hreflang="en">al-Khalil (Hebron)</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1413" hreflang="en">Migration</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 19 Dec 2018 19:11:30 +0000 Kathy Kern 12162 at https://cpt.org CPT INTERNATIONAL: Engage with peace in the new year: Join a CPT Delegation in 2019! https://cpt.org/cptnet/2018/12/18/cpt-international-engage-peace-new-year-join-cpt-delegation-2019 <span>CPT INTERNATIONAL: Engage with peace in the new year: Join a CPT Delegation in 2019! </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Tue, 12/18/2018 - 10:29</span> <div><table class="mcnTextBlock" style="caret-color:#000000; color:#000000; font-family:-webkit-standard; font-style:normal; font-variant-caps:normal; font-weight:normal; letter-spacing:normal; orphans:auto; text-align:start; text-transform:none; white-space:normal; widows:auto; word-spacing:0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust:auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px; text-decoration:none; border-collapse:collapse; min-width:100%; border:undefined" width="100%"> <tbody class="mcnTextBlockOuter"> <tr> <td class="mcnTextBlockInner" style="padding-top:9px" valign="top"> <h3>Engage with peace in the new year: Join a CPT Delegation in 2019!</h3> <p>Are you thinking about your plans for 2019? Do you want to learn more about nonviolent resistance in the face of oppression, and meet CPT's teams and partners in the field?&nbsp; <strong>Read more to learn about the delegations we have in store for the coming year.</strong></p> <h1 class="text-align-center"><a href="https://cpt.org/delegations">Join a CPT Delegation </a></h1> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img alt="887a7ab6-150b-4171-9ecc-c4df702044a9_0.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="400" src="/sites/default/files/887a7ab6-150b-4171-9ecc-c4df702044a9_0.jpg" width="600" /></p> <p>US society grows increasingly more aware of the atrocities committed at the US/Mexico border, and the violent and oppressive tactics employed against migrants, including refugees. Join Christian Peacemaker Teams in exploring the region and context in which these atrocities take place. Participants will learn about the impacts of&nbsp;immigration policy on both sides of the border, and meet with individuals, communities, and organizations that grapple directly with its consequences. Join us to become a witness to the pain of the borderlands, and to the incredible individuals who face this conflict&nbsp;head-on.</p> <h1 class="text-align-center"><a href="https://cpt.org/delegations/borderlands">Learn More</a></h1> <table align="left" class="mcnTextContentContainer" style="border-collapse:collapse; max-width:100%; min-width:100%; border:undefined" width="100%"> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1396" hreflang="en">Borderlands</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1413" hreflang="en">Migration</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1400" hreflang="en">CPT International</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 18 Dec 2018 16:29:18 +0000 Kathy Kern 12160 at https://cpt.org Third Sunday in Advent: JOY of the Manoomin* Harvest https://cpt.org/cptnet/2018/12/15/third-sunday-advent-joy-manoomin-harvest <span>Third Sunday in Advent: JOY of the Manoomin* Harvest</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/26" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathy Kern</span></span> <span>Sat, 12/15/2018 - 10:59</span> <div><table class="Table" style="caret-color:#000000; color:#000000; font-family:-webkit-standard; font-style:normal; font-variant-caps:normal; font-weight:normal; letter-spacing:normal; orphans:auto; text-align:start; text-transform:none; white-space:normal; widows:auto; word-spacing:0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust:auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px; text-decoration:none; border-collapse:collapse; border:none"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="border:none; width:564pt; padding:0in 5.4pt" valign="top" width="564"> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt"><img alt="wild rice harvest_0.JPG" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="450" src="/sites/default/files/wild%20rice%20harvest_0.JPG" width="600" /></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><b><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Advent Reflections 2018</span></span></span></b></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><i><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Christian Peacemaker Teams wish to celebrate this Advent season by offering reflections on the symbols of each&nbsp;</span></span></span></i></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><i><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Advent candle. Week to week, each of our teams will share a story in honor of the season.</span></span></span></i></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><i><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">This Sunday, we consider the theme of Joy.</span></span></span></i></span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">JOY of the Manoomin* Harvest</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">by Kathy Moorhead Thiessen</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:10pt"><span style="font-family:-webkit-standard, serif"><span style="color:black">JOY</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Of running my fingers through the black kernels of manoomin.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Of remembering the five days of harvest with our good friend Shoon Keewatin.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Riding in the motorboat over the string of lake and rivers, high winds causing waves to churn into the boat and soak our clothes. Sunshine and warm winds drying us out as we set up camp.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Shoon told us: “This is where my family came every year: twelve tents set up with all generations. The children played and worked, the adults worked hard. We spent weeks here, gathering and processing the manoomin, for our family to eat, and to sell.” &nbsp;</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Manoomin: Carbs, complete protein, vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese. Nutrient-rich food. Free except for the hard work. Growing in the shallow edges of the waterways of the Anishinaabe traditional territory. Now, it is rare to find anyone coming to harvest. So Shoon was happy to take three non-Indigenous persons out on his boat to look for the kernel-laden plants.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">After a day of harvest, we head back to Grassy Narrows through the lake and river system. The sun shone, and jackets came off, as Shoon taught us to ignite a slow fire and use an old paddle to stir the kernels in a large pot until the husks became brown and the fine tails were roasted off.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Then, the dancing began. A hole in the ground with tarps. Rice dancing moccasins on our feet. Sliding over the kernels and dislodging the husks.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Using the breeze to blow away the outside coverings, revealing the dark, brown, long, slim kernels.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Then it is time to cook and eat.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">JOY</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">Of being on the land, to learn the ways that the harvest of manoonim has been done for centuries.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="font-size:medium"><span style="font-family:Cambria"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri"><span style="color:black">*&nbsp;<i>Manoomin&nbsp;</i>is the Ojibwe word for wild rice. But although it grows in the water like rice, manoomin is actually a species of grass that produces edible seeds.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin:0in 0in 8pt; text-align:start; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px">&nbsp;</p> <p dir="ltr"><b id="docs-internal-guid-1fd7e4f5-7fff-5dfb-310d-88589c02d528">---</b></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Kathy Moorhead Thiessen has worked with CPT since training in summer 2010. She served on the Iraqi Kurdistan team until 2015, and then joined the Indigenous Peoples Solidarity team. She has learned so much while out on the land from our Anishinaabe friends and partners.</p> <p><br /> &nbsp;</p> </div> <div> <div>Categories</div> <div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1404" hreflang="en">Indigenous Peoples Solidarity</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1397" hreflang="en">Canada</a></div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/1423" hreflang="en">Lectionary</a></div> </div> </div> Sat, 15 Dec 2018 16:59:01 +0000 Kathy Kern 12159 at https://cpt.org