Hebron: Remembering Tom Fox

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On March 9, 2007, Hebron team members held a short memorial service to mark the first anniversary of the death of CPTer Tom Fox in Iraq. Fox was killed after kidnappers held him hostage for four months. During the short commemoration, the group planted an olive tree near the CPT apartment.

About fifty Palestinians, internationals and CPTers met beside the Ibrahimi Mosque, then walked in two groups to a dividing fence outside the CPT apartment. The fence prevents Palestinian access from the Old City market to Shuhada Street.

Some CPTers and the Palestinians walked through the Old City market with the tree. Other CPTers and the internationals walked up Shuhada Street with a commemorative plaque. The two groups met on either side of the dividing fence.

During the memorial event, participants passed through an open gate from one side of the fence to the other, demonstrating the need to transcend barriers in order to make peace. Children from the Old City, symbolizing hope for the future, planted the olive tree beside the fence. Later that afternoon, Israeli soldiers came and locked the gate.

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