Canada

ALERTA DE ACCIĂ“N DE JUSTICIA INDĂŤGENA: Apoyen l@s ayunadores de la Reserva IndĂ­gena de Elsipogtog.


ALERTA DE ACCIĂ“N DE JUSTICIA INDĂŤGENA: Apoyen l@s ayunadores de la Reserva IndĂ­gena de Elsipogtog.

Miembros de la Reserva IndĂ­gena de Elsipogtog iniciaron un ayuno, incluyendo agua, que durará hasta el 9 de julio de 2013. El ayuno tiene como objetivo pedir protecciĂłn y perdĂłn a la Madre Tierra por el daño que las pruebas sĂ­smicas que adelanta la CorporaciĂłn SWN para la exploraciĂłn de gas de esquisto le hayan causado al agua y la tierra.  

L@s ayunadores le están pidiendo a l@s miembros de ECAP y otr@s simpatizantes que ayunen con ell@s, o que cuando consuman comidas y bebidas oren para fortalecer a l@s que están ayunando. La semana pasada la Policía canadiense arrestó al Jefe John Levi, uno de los líderes del movimiento contra la exploración de gas de esquisto en Elsipogtog, y a Miles Howe, un periodista que se encontraba informando sobre la protesta.

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: Elsipogtog First Nation members begin fasting ceremonies for forgiveness and protection to last until 9 July 2013

 

At Milliea’s request, CPT Aboriginal Justice Team members Chris Sabas and Robin Buyers began an accompaniment of the fasting ceremonies deep in the New Brunswick bush on Saturday, July 6th. “The women are fasting for forgiveness for the damage caused to the Mother—the land and the water—by the [test] explosions,” said Milliea. “The men are fasting for protection.”

Participants are committed to going without food and water for twenty-four hours or more in spite of up to forty-degree (104-degree Fahrenheit) heat and high humidity. “Water is life,” explained Milliea. “When a person commits to giving up water, they give up their life.” A sip of water, which will conclude the fast, marks the return to life.

Water is at the centre of community resistance to the presence of SWN in Kent County. While concern has been growing about water contamination by shale gas exploration and development for several years, the start of seismic testing by SWN, and the damage to the land that has resulted, has escalated tensions. Police presence in the region is highly visible.

At the same time, the Elsipogtog Mi’kmaq First Nation and their neighbours are building deeper alliances. While the fasting ceremonies took place in the bush, the Sacred Fire site hosted several hundred members of more than twenty faith and environmental groups for a 6 July rally and potluck.

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Fasts will continue until 9 July 2013.  The Elsipogtog community asks CPTers and other allies to support the fast by choosing either to fast themselves, or to serve as helpers, prayerfully eating and drinking with the intention of strengthening those fasting by taking in nourishment on their behalf.

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: Elsipogtog Warrior Chief John Levi remanded to custody

Elsipogtog Warrior Chief John Levi was remanded to custody this morning on allegations of breach of probation, due to recent, suspicious criminal charges filed against him.

Levi had invited CPT’s Aboriginal Justice Team to accompany local efforts to stop shale gas exploration on Elsipogtog traditional lands.  A team has been present since Sunday 28 June, with more CPTers scheduled to arrive Saturday.

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 Demonstrators at site of Howe's arrest

According to trusted sources within the community, the underlying probation stems from a conviction of fishing without a license on the Elsipogtog Reserve, Levi’s home territory, in 2011.  He is now facing two additional criminal charges, Mischief and Obstruction, due to allegations stemming from actions on 21 June, Aboriginal Day.

 On that day, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) arrested  twelve people who were protesting seismic testing in preparation for shale gas exploration on Elsipogtog traditional lands in Kent County, New Brunswick.  Officers neither arrested nor issued a citation to Levi on that day.  Instead, his probation officer summoned him Thursday 4 July, informing him that the RCMP had filed a breach of probation petition against him and that he must appear in court on Friday, 5 July 2013.  The RCMP officer who filed the criminal charges against Levi is the same officer who arrested and confiscated the phone and camera of Media Co-op Journalist Miles Howe on 4 July, and charged him with “uttering threats” and obstructing justice.

CPT INTERNATIONAL: Urgent invitations from Colombia, Elsipogtog and the Owe Aku--Can you help us respond?


A week ago, on 30 May 2013, we got word from Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) Colombia that Tito, one of the members of Las Pavas community in Colombia, had been attacked with machetes by workers for Aportes San Isidro, the palm oil company that has been trying to push the community of Las Pavas off their land for many years…



Tito (yellow and green shirt) taking
picture of security guard who had
ordered his men to shoot out tires of
Las Pavas's tractor.
 

This attack is an escalation of the pressure on this community that is deeply committed to nonviolence.  The Las Pavas leadership asked CPT to provide increased accompaniment for community members as they walk to and from their fields.  Our team on the ground is already stretched thin and they have made an appeal to CPT reservists to support them.  We have people ready to go to Colombia if we can raise the funds. Can you contribute $10 now to make this possible?…

This request is just one of four that CPT has received in the two weeks.  On 8 June 2013, our Aboriginal Justice team sent a group of reservists to New Brunswick, Canada in response to an invitation 48 hours earlier from Elsipogtog First Nation. Mi'kmaq and Maliseet peoples have been using creative Nonviolent Direct Action to stop shale gas exploration on their traditional lands, including peacefully blockading a truck hired by the exploration company, SWN Resources Canada.

ELSIPOGTOG FRACKING PROTEST UPDATE: 9-14 June 2013

“The role of the warrior chief is to protect the land, the water and the people.  Our only weapons are our drums, our sweetgrasses, our pipes, and our ceremonies.  We are nonviolent.”

This description was how John Levi, warrior chief of the Elsipogtog First Nation, explained his role to an emergency CPT exploratory delegation to his New Brunswick Mi’kmaq community located north of Moncton.

The Elsipogtog First Nation and non-Aboriginal landowners in Kent County, New Brunswick are fighting to stop shale gas exploration by SWN Resources.  They are concerned fracking will lead to the depletion of groundwater and widespread water contamination.

Fracking is a slang term for the process of digging deep wells (up to two miles) into the earth and injecting water under high pressure laden with industrial chemicals to fracture shale.  The procedure releases otherwise inaccessible deposits of natural gas.

Each frack uses millions of gallons of water laden with hundreds of different chemicals.  Resource companies have not had to disclose the types of chemicals they are using because of patent protections.  Scientists have identified volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene.

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USA-CANADA: Peace, Pies and Prophets to tour Ohio, western PA and...

After successful runs in eastern Pennsylvania and the Midwest, 
the Peace, Pies and Prophets tour is headed to western
Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana in September and October.
Booking in U.S. and Canadian venues is available through 2013.

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: River Run aims to heal poisoned communities

Fifty years after mercury dumping began to turn their lives upside-down, Grassy Narrows First Nation is seeking justice and healing for the people and land affected.

River Run, a week of public events and actions in support of Grassy Narrows, took place in Toronto 4-8 June. Christian Peacemaker Teams’ Aboriginal Justice Team helped to organize the event. 

TORONTO REFLECTION: Choosing hope

“The entire history of man is war,” the speaker told us, “conflict driven by racial, religious and territorial ambition.”

He sounded regretful, as if he wished it could be otherwise, but knew it was foolish and negligent to trust any force other than violence for the common good. As he went on, outlining the dangers of Islamic immigration to Western countries, he branded those who disagreed with his analysis as “naïve,” even “traitors.” I saw that most of the crowd agreed.

TORONTO, ON: The freedom to say no

“By the mixing of our waters, it becomes your responsibility to protect our water, and our responsibility to protect your water.”  Hereditary Chief Pete Erickson of the northern British Columbia Carrier Sekani First Nation completed the final water ceremony before a crowd of over four hundred supporters in downtown Toronto on Wednesday, 9 May 2012.  As representative of one of the five-member First Nations of the Yinka Dene Alliance, Chief Erickson, along with a delegation of over fifty First Nation representatives, had just completed the ten day Freedom Train journey across Canada’s west to highlight the nations’ opposition to Enbridge corporation’s proposed Northern Gateway tar sands pipeline through their territory.

The Yinka Dene territories are located in the headwaters of the Fraser, Skeena and Mackenzie/Arctic watersheds. Their people have relied on salmon since time immemorial. Their territory is 25% of the 1,177 km through which the proposed pipeline will carry raw tar sands crude from Bruderheim in the Alberta Tar Sands to the inland coastal community of Kitimat, British Columbia. Citing the infamous Exxon Valdez tanker spill, the Yinka Dene and supporters fear contamination from pipeline ruptures and tanker spills of catastrophic proportions.

ABORIGINAL JUSTICE: KI celebrates bittersweet victory

On 29 March 2012, the Ontario government paid $3.5 million to mining company God’s Lake Resources (GLR) to walk away from its leases, located on Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug (KI) lands.  Multiple sacred KI graves lie within the claim area.  KI had issued an eviction notice to GLR last September.

For KI, one of the largest First Nations communities in the region, it was perhaps a dĂ©jĂ  vu moment.  Following the 2008 sentencing of six months in prison of six community leaders for protecting their land from mining exploration by Platinex Corp., the province bought out Platinex for $5 million.  The “KI 6” served sixty-eight days before a judge released them unconditionally on sentencing appeal