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CPT INTERNATIONAL: Train with CPT – Join CPT’s Peacemaker Corps

CPTnet
March 2, 2017
CPT INTERNATIONAL: Train with CPT – Join CPT’s Peacemaker Corps 

 

 

Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) is currently accepting applications for its Peacemaker Corps.  Join us in building partnerships to transform violence and oppression!  

Applicants must be 21 years of age or older and have completed, or plan to complete, a short-term CPT Delegation or internship.  Qualified applicants may be invited to participate in CPT’s intensive, month-long training from 13 July – 13 August 2017 in Chicago, Illinois USA where membership in the Peacemaker Corps is discerned.  Trained Peacemaker Corps members are then eligible to apply for open positions on CPT teams.  

CPT builds partnerships to transform violence and oppression in situations of lethal conflict around the world.  We are committed to work and relationships that: 1) honor and reflect the presence of faith and spirituality, 2) strengthen grassroots initiatives, 3) transform structures of domination and oppression, and 4) embody creative nonviolence and liberating love. 

CPT understands violence to be rooted in systemic structures of oppression.  We are committed to undoing oppressions within our own lives and in the policies and practices of our organization.   

CPT is a Christian-identified organization with multi-faith/spiritually diverse membership.  We seek individuals who are capable, responsible and rooted in faith/spirituality to work for peace as members of violence-reduction teams trained in the disciplines of nonviolence.  We are committed to building a Peacemaker Corps that reflects the rich diversity of the human family in ability, age, class, ethnicity, gender identity, language, national origin, race and sexual orientation. 

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 15 March 2017; direct any questions and send complete application to personnel@cpt.org.

CPT INTERNATIONAL: CPT authors contribute to to new book, Unsettling the Word


For generations, the Bible has been employed by settler colonial societies as a weapon to dispossess Indigenous and racialized peoples of their lands, cultures, and spiritualities. Given this devastating legacy, many want nothing to do with it. But is it possible for the exploited and their allies to reclaim the Bible from the dominant powers? Can we make it an instrument for justice in the cause of the oppressed? Even a nonviolent weapon toward decolonization?

In Unsettling the Word, more than 60 Indigenous and Settler authors come together to wrestle with the Scriptures, re-reading and re-imagining the ancient text for the sake of reparative futures.  Among these contributors are  CPTers Steve Heinrichs, who edits the book, Peter Haresnape and Kathy Moorhead Thiessen. Lisa Martens, a CPT alum, also provides a reflection.

Created by Mennonite Church Canada’s Indigenous-Settler Relations program, Unsettling the Word is intended to nurture courageous conversations with the Bible, our current settler colonial contexts, and the Church’s call to costly peacemaking. 

CPT INTERNATIONAL: APPLY NOW for summer Colombia and Indigenous Peoples Solidarity delegations

 

 

 

The Christian Peacemaker Team Colombia and Indigenous Peoples Solidarity Delegations still have openings!  

Get your application in for the June 26-July 6, 2018 Colombia delegation by May 26.

Click here to apply.

Prayers for Peacemakers 25 April 2018 Indigenous Peoples Solidarity

Prayers for Peacemakers 25 April 2018

 
 On Friday April 20, at the terminal of theTrans Mountain pipeline expansion, a small group of faith leaders hold copies of United Nations Declaration on 
the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Photo Credit: Christine Boyle.

Pray for religious leaders and all people of faith and spirit who, on 28 April, will join the Coast Salish people on Burnaby Mountain, British Colombia, Canada. The Coast Salish members, spiritual leaders and youth will be on the land continuing to resist the Kinder Morgan pipeline and tanker project. They are witness to the danger of the oil project that is threatening the Coast Salish lands, waters, culture and spirit.

Although this movement has continued for the last seven years, there have been huge marches and actions as the construction is set to begin.   Recently, at the end of March, 176 people were arrested for blocking the Kinder Morgan terminal at the Burnaby Mountain site. Last week, BC Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Affleck has called for them to face criminal prosecution. Amnesty International Canada cautions against this move, saying that criminal charges must be saved for situations where safety, lives or serious concerns about property damage are at stake. People have the right to nonviolent, peaceful protest.

CPTer Esther Kern receives Muriel Duckworth Award for Peace Activism at VOW International Women's Day Dinner, Toronto

Esther Kern at her award banquet surrounded by her Christian Peacemaker Team colleagues

On Thursday, 8 March 2018, Esther Kern, former Canada Coordinator of Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) received the Muriel Duckworth Award for Peace Activism at the Voice of Women for Peace International Women’s Day Dinner held at Friend’s (Quaker) House in Toronto.  She was a member of a select, influential group of women at the event to receive awards for such diverse contributions as Youth Peace Leadership, Peace Writing, Peace Activism, Peace Education and Award of Distinction. 

Prayers for Peacemakers 22 March 2018 Indigenous Peoples Solidarity

Prayers for Peacemakers 22 March 2018  Indigenous Peoples Solidarity

On World Water Day (22 March), please hold the people of Grassy Narrows, Wabaseemoong, and  Wabauskang First Nations in your thoughts and prayers as they remember those who have died and continue to suffer the health impacts of mercury poisoning.  CPT-Indigenous Peoples Solidarity and other supporters will be accompanying community members of Grassy Narrows as they hold a vigil in Dryden, Ontario, where a pulp and paper mill dumped ten tonnes of toxic mercury into the Wabigoon River in the 1960s, poisoning the people upstream. May the hearts and minds of the public be open to understanding and justice for the intergenerational environmental harm caused by this industrial activity. 

Youth from Grassy Narrows perform "Home to Me" at Queens Park, Toronto, at June 2016 River Run. Only a month earlier, leading North
 American mercury researchers released a report describing a number of promising possibilities for eliminating mercury in the
 English-Wabigoon river system, which, until then, the Ontario government repeatedly claimed would only make matters worst." 

Prayers for Peacemakers 14 February 2018 Indigenous Peoples Solidarity

Prayers for Peacemakers 14 February 2018  Indigenous Peoples Solidarity

 

Keep Errol Greene's family in your thoughts and prayers, as the inquest investigating his death in custody is taking place in Winnipeg this month.

 

 

 

Errol, 26, a loving father of four, was taken into custody in Winnipeg's Remand center on 29 April 2016. He was epileptic and taking medication to prevent his seizures. Errol asked the prison guards and nurses for his medications several times, but his request was neglected (according to his wife, Rochelle Pranteau).

On 1 May 2016, while on the phone talking to his wife, he had a seizure. The guards used excessive force by handcuffing him from behind, shackling his legs, and dragging him into a cell. They only returned with a nurse after fifteen minutes, by which time his soul had left his body.

His death is an example of not only the unjustified high numbers of Indigenous incarcerations, but also the inhumane way the colonial system treats indigenous people.

Prayers for Peacemakers, 10 January 2017 Indigenous Peoples Solidarity

Prayers for Peacemakers, 10 January 2017  Indigenous Peoples Solidarity

 

Pray for the family and other loved ones of Windy Sinclair, a 29-year-old Anishinaabe woman from Winnipeg who froze to death in the bitter cold around Christmas. 

Pray that the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority will be accountable to the circumstances that led to this vulnerable woman slipping out of the emergency room into the -28 C snowy night before being discharged.

 Winnipeg has the highest population of urban Indigenous people in Canada, and IPS often hears stories from indigenous partners about receiving inadequate care in the hospitals of this city. Sinclair’s mother is still looking for answers to her questions as to how her daughter, suffering the effects of a drug addiction, could slip out of the emergency room and stay missing for three days without anyone informing the family or the police.

As she said to the Winnipeg Free Press, "I feel they failed her because she was a native woman. They failed me as a mother because they didn’t notify me when she left on her own. When I called, they tell me she’s treated and discharged. It takes calling back for them to tell me the truth," she said. "Why? Because it’s just another native woman. Just another native woman that passed away. Just another native woman who goes missing.”

 
 Windy Sinclair sits with her four children, photo supplied by her family to the media.

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES SOLIDARITY NEWSLETTER: Fall 2017

Let's Walk The Talk of Reconciliation
 
Since last spring, IPS has taken an active role in the Walk the Talk campaign. This campaign aimed at building public pressure on the Canadian government to fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on Rights of Indigenous Peoples by passing Bill C-262, a private member’s bill proposed by Cree NDP MP Romeo Saganash. The team has co-organized a series of public actions that have succeeded in raising the profile of the bill.

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES' SOLIDARITY: Struggle, promise, despair, repeat--Indigenous rights activism in the age of 'reconciliation'

Last November 2016, CPTers accompanied a women-led, silent, peace procession at Standing Rock (ND).

On 5 December, Cree Member of Parliament (MP) Romeo Saganash “extended his hand…for reconciliation to all Canadians and all Parliamentarians” with a 2nd reading of Bill C-262: the Indigenous Human Rights Act. During the first hour of debate in the House of Commons, the Liberal party affirmed their support for the Bill and the implementation of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.[1]